enterotoxin

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Related to Enterotoxins: endotoxin, Exotoxins

enterotoxin

 [en´ter-o-tok″sin]
a toxin specifically affecting cells of the intestinal mucosa, causing vomiting and diarrhea, such as those elaborated by species of Bacillus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Staphylococcus, and Vibrio.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin),
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

(ĕn′tə-rō-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
Any of various bacterially produced toxins that specifically affect intestinal cells and cause vomiting and diarrhea, as in staphylococcal food poisoning and cholera.

enterotoxin

Infectious disease A toxin with a direct effect on the intestinal mucosa, eliciting net fluid secretion; the 'classic' enterotoxin is cholera toxin, which evokes intestinal fluid secretion, by activating adenylate cyclase. See Endotoxin, Exotoxin.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin)
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

Any bacterial toxin that damages intestinal tissue and causes diarrhoea and vomiting, the signs of food poisoning.

Enterotoxin

A type of harmful protein released by bacteria and other disease agents that affects the tissues lining the intestines.
Mentioned in: Dysentery
References in periodicals archive ?
ETEC strain infections that produce STa enterotoxin alone or STa plus LT enterotoxins tend to be more severe than those caused by ETEC strains producing LT alone (13).
Toxin detection kits are commercially available and can detect staphylococcal enterotoxins A through E directly from food.
Mechanism of toxin secretion by Vibrio cholerae investigated in strains harboring plasmids that encode heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli.
Fueyo JM, Mendoza MC, Martin MC (2005) Enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin in Staphylococcus aureus recovered from human nasal carriers and manually handled foods: epidemiological and genetic findings.
Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa, 1 [micro]mol [l.sup.-1], Sigma, Missouri; Giannella, 1995; Krause et al., 1997) was used as a stimulator of the type-C plasma membrane guanylyl cyclase receptor (Wong and Garbers, 1992; Mayhan, 2000; Chen et al., 2001; see also Schulz, 1992, for review).
coli strains secreted a novel heat-stable enterotoxin and/or a heat-labile enterotoxin resembling cholera toxin, which accounted for their virulence.
aureus colonization and identification of enterotoxins A, B, C, or D.
Tomi, M.D., and Elisabeth Aberer, M.D., of Karl Franzens University in Graz, Austria, theorized that enterotoxins might act as superantigens in stimulating dysfunction within T-cells and keratinocytes, triggering psoriasis.