acorn worm

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acorn worm

a hemichordate, one of the three groups of invertebrate chordates collectively referred to as PROTOCHORDATES.
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The acorn worms (Enteropneusta) were represented by 16 specimens found mainly during the rainy season (Fig.
The early development of an enteropneusta Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz.
A homologous amino acid sequence alignment of the various CacyBP proteins from Arthropoda, Enteropneusta, Mollusca, Cephalochordata, and Vertebrata was performed using ClustalX.
Interrelationships between Enteropneusta and Pterobranchia have been controversial.
The phylum Hemichordata is divided into two classes: Pterobranchia and Enteropneusta. Pterobranchs, represented by about 30 described species, are found from littoral to continental slope depths, whereas enteropneusts, with about 100 described species, live predominantly in the littoral zone (Hyman, 1959) but have occasionally been found in the deep sea.
Deuterostomia is a super phylum that encompasses hemichordates (Enteropneusta), echinoderms (sea urchins), and chordates (vertebrates); along with the phylum protostomia, it represents all animals having bilateral symmetry at least early in development (Fig.
Structure, ultrastructure, and function of the preoral heart-kidney of Saccoglossus Kowalevskii (Hemichordata, Enteropneusta) including new data on the stomochord.
Nervous system of the tornaria larva (Hemichordata, Enteropneusta).
Structure of the nervous system in the tornaria larva of Balanoglossus proterogonius (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta) and its phylogenetic implications.
Structure, ultrastructure, and function of the preoral heart-kidney in Saccoglossum kowalevskii (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta) including new data on the stomochord.
The deuterostome phylum Hemichordata is composed of three extant classes: the Enteropneusta are solitary worms, the Pterobranchia are colonial tube-dwelling suspension feeders, and the Planktosphaeroidea are known only from their larvae.
The Enteropneusta have long been considered classical mucociliary feeders, collecting their food particles on the proboscis with mucous secretions, and transporting them on the surface of multiciliated cells to the mouth (Barrington, 1940; Knight-Jones, 1953; Burdon-Jones, 1962; Thomas, 1972).