Enterococcus faecalis


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Enterococcus faecalis

a bacterial species found in human feces and in the intestines of many warm-blooded animals; occasionally found in urinary infections and in blood and heart lesions in cases of subacute endocarditis; a major cause of nosocomial infection, especially in association with gram-negative pathogens.

En·ter·o·coc·cus fae·ca·lis

(en'tĕr-ō-kok'ŭs fē-kā'lis)
A bacterial species found in human feces and in the intestines of many warm-blooded animals; occasionally found in urinary infections and in blood and heart lesions in subacute endocarditis; a major cause of nosocomial infection, especially in association with gram-negative pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
MONDAY, July 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of infective endocarditis (IE) is about 26 percent among patients with Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia, according to a study published in the July 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
The in vitro activity of Xerava was compared to a variety of other antibiotics against a total of 15,887 Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens and showed that Xerava was more active than meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii.
BP - operator of the Clair Ridge field, 50 miles west of Shetland - is investigating the source of the enterococcus faecalis contamination.
[7] Enterococcus faecium is a leading cause of multidrug resistant enterococcal infections over Enterococcus faecalis. 40% of medical intensive care units reportedly with E.
(9) Multiplex PCR using specific ddl E.faecalis and ddl E.faecium genes was performed to identify both Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium respectively.
Recently, the genus Enterococcus is composed of thirty-eight species; Enterococcus faecalis (E.
[3] Enterococcus faecalis can colonize the dentinal tubules and reinfect the obturated root canal as it can survive chemomechanical instrumentation and intracanal medication.
A large variety of bacteria such as Staph aureus, Streptococcus viridians, Enterococcus faecalis and Staph pyogenes are responsible for these infections.