Enterobacteriaceae

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Enterobacteriaceae

 [en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e]
a family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, usually motile, made up of saprophytes and plant and animal parasites of worldwide distribution, found in soil, water, and plants and in animals from insects to humans. In humans, disease is produced by both invasive action and production of toxin. Species not normally associated with disease are often opportunistic pathogens. Enterobacteriaceae have been responsible for as many as half of the nosocomial infections reported annually in the United States, most frequently by species of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, and Serratia.

En·ter·o·bac·te·ri·a·ce·ae

(en'tĕr-ō-bak-ter'ē-ā'sē-ē),
A family of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonsporeforming bacteria (order Eubacteriales) containing gram-negative rods. Some species are nonmotile, and nonmotile variants of motile species occur; the motile cells are peritrichous. These organisms grow well on artificial media. They reduce nitrates to nitrites and use glucose fermentatively with the production of acid or acid and gas. Indophenol oxidase is not produced by these organisms. They do not liquefy alginate, and pectate is liquefied only by members of one genus, Pectobacterium. This family includes many animal parasites and some plant parasites causing blights, galls, and soft rots. Some of these organisms occur as saprophytes that decompose carbohydrate-containing plant materials. The type genus is Escherichia.

Enterobacteriaceae

Microbiology A family of gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobic bacteria, most of which are motile–peritrichous flagella, oxidase-negative and have relatively simple growth requirements; Enterobacteriaceae are primarily saprobes, are widely distributed in nature in plants and animals, and are important pathogens; they are part of the intestinal flora, and popularly termed gram-negative rods–GNRs; they cause ±12 of all nosocomial infections in the US, most commonly by Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, and Salmonella spp; less pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae include Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Erwinia, Hafnia, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia spp. See Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Hafnia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, Salmonella, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
For microalgal biomass digestion, metagenome analysis was especially valuable to identify potential alga-lytic bacteria (members of the orders Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, and Enterobacteriales), and further studies will include isolation of this poorly studied group of microorganisms.
No differences were observed for Enterobacteriales, Pseudomonadales, Erysipelotrichales, or Caulobacteriales.
(Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) (Rodriguez 1999) and Pseudomonas sp.
Phylum class Order Comp_1 Firmicutes clostridia Clostridiales * 84% 84% 84% Comp_2 Proteobacteria Gammaproteobacteria Enterobacteriales 100% 100% 100% Comp_4 Frimicutes clostridia clostridiales * 77% 65% 64% Comp_5 Firmicutes clostridia clostridiales 98% 98% 98% Comp_6 Bacteroidetes Bacteroidia Bacteroidales 100% 99% 99% Family Genus Comp_1 Lactinospiraceae Lactinofactor 22% 10% Comp_2 Enterobacteriaceae Escherichia/Shigella * 100% 85% Comp_4 Incertae sedis XI Parvimonas 15% 9% Comp_5 Ruminococcaceae Faecalibacterium * 97% 94% Comp_6 Bacteroidaceae Bacteroides * 91% 91% * The cut-off value of the bootstrap confidence threshold was set at 50%.
sericata poseen en su intestino un comensal, Proteus mirabilis Hauser, 1885 (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae), el cual es capaz de destruir las bacterias cuando pasan por el tracto digestivo de estos organismos; esta accion es complementada por la naturaleza antimicrobiana de las excreciones y secreciones larvales liberadas en la lesion.
That being said, the abundance of genera identified in the order: Enterobacteriales and those with documented insect associations (Table 1, Suppl.