Enterobacteriaceae

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Related to Enterobacteriaceae infections: Enterobacter gergoviae

Enterobacteriaceae

 [en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e]
a family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, usually motile, made up of saprophytes and plant and animal parasites of worldwide distribution, found in soil, water, and plants and in animals from insects to humans. In humans, disease is produced by both invasive action and production of toxin. Species not normally associated with disease are often opportunistic pathogens. Enterobacteriaceae have been responsible for as many as half of the nosocomial infections reported annually in the United States, most frequently by species of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, and Serratia.

En·ter·o·bac·te·ri·a·ce·ae

(en'tĕr-ō-bak-ter'ē-ā'sē-ē),
A family of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonsporeforming bacteria (order Eubacteriales) containing gram-negative rods. Some species are nonmotile, and nonmotile variants of motile species occur; the motile cells are peritrichous. These organisms grow well on artificial media. They reduce nitrates to nitrites and use glucose fermentatively with the production of acid or acid and gas. Indophenol oxidase is not produced by these organisms. They do not liquefy alginate, and pectate is liquefied only by members of one genus, Pectobacterium. This family includes many animal parasites and some plant parasites causing blights, galls, and soft rots. Some of these organisms occur as saprophytes that decompose carbohydrate-containing plant materials. The type genus is Escherichia.

Enterobacteriaceae

Microbiology A family of gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobic bacteria, most of which are motile–peritrichous flagella, oxidase-negative and have relatively simple growth requirements; Enterobacteriaceae are primarily saprobes, are widely distributed in nature in plants and animals, and are important pathogens; they are part of the intestinal flora, and popularly termed gram-negative rods–GNRs; they cause ±12 of all nosocomial infections in the US, most commonly by Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, and Salmonella spp; less pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae include Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Erwinia, Hafnia, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia spp. See Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Hafnia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, Salmonella, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this review, 113 patients with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections were successfully identified at the community hospital during the 3-year study period (Table 1).
Patients with CRE infections accounted for 17.6% of the cases, and patients with XDR Enterobacteriaceae infections accounted for 4.0% of the cases.
During the analysis of mortality-related risk factors in patients with bloodstream Enterobacteriaceae infections in this study, CRE infection was a relevant but not an independent risk factor, which might be associated with the low overall number of cases.
Table 2--Subgroup analysis of overall mortality with polymyxin-based therapy versus control antibiotics for treatment of carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections in controlled studies.
In conclusion, our findings suggest that the number of deaths attributable to carbapenem resistance is considerably high among persons with Enterobacteriaceae infections. Further original studies are needed to determine the reason(s) for the increased risk for death from carbapenem-resistant isolates versus carbapenem-susceptible isolates.
evaluated modifiable risk factors for antimicrobial drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection among patients from a long-term Veterans Affairs facility in Pittsburgh (13).
In addition to antimicrobial drug exposure, the percentage of residents with gastrostomy tubes in the home was also found to predict Enterobacteriaceae infection resistant to third-generation cephalosporins.
These results suggest that ertapenem may have an important place in the treatment of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections in the absence of Pseudomonas, and that antibiotic use policies that promote stewardship may decrease antibiotic resistance.
In France, [Beta]-lactamases and fluoroquinolones are the most frequently prescribed antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae infections. A multicenter study (14 hospitals) across the country analyzed the antibiotic susceptibility of 2,507 and 2,312 consecutive, nonrepetitive enterobacteria responsible for infection in 1996 and 1997, respectively (1,2).