Enterobacteriaceae


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Enterobacteriaceae

 [en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e]
a family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, usually motile, made up of saprophytes and plant and animal parasites of worldwide distribution, found in soil, water, and plants and in animals from insects to humans. In humans, disease is produced by both invasive action and production of toxin. Species not normally associated with disease are often opportunistic pathogens. Enterobacteriaceae have been responsible for as many as half of the nosocomial infections reported annually in the United States, most frequently by species of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, and Serratia.

En·ter·o·bac·te·ri·a·ce·ae

(en'tĕr-ō-bak-ter'ē-ā'sē-ē),
A family of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonsporeforming bacteria (order Eubacteriales) containing gram-negative rods. Some species are nonmotile, and nonmotile variants of motile species occur; the motile cells are peritrichous. These organisms grow well on artificial media. They reduce nitrates to nitrites and use glucose fermentatively with the production of acid or acid and gas. Indophenol oxidase is not produced by these organisms. They do not liquefy alginate, and pectate is liquefied only by members of one genus, Pectobacterium. This family includes many animal parasites and some plant parasites causing blights, galls, and soft rots. Some of these organisms occur as saprophytes that decompose carbohydrate-containing plant materials. The type genus is Escherichia.

Enterobacteriaceae

/En·tero·bac·te·ri·a·ceae/ (en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e) a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria (order Eubacteriales) occurring as plant or animal parasites or as saprophytes.

Enterobacteriaceae

[en′tirōbaktir′ē·ā′si·ē]
Etymology: Gk, enteron + bakterion, small staff
a family of aerobic and anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that includes both normal and pathogenic enteric microorganisms. Among the significant genera of the family are Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Salmonella.

Enterobacteriaceae

Microbiology A family of gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobic bacteria, most of which are motile–peritrichous flagella, oxidase-negative and have relatively simple growth requirements; Enterobacteriaceae are primarily saprobes, are widely distributed in nature in plants and animals, and are important pathogens; they are part of the intestinal flora, and popularly termed gram-negative rods–GNRs; they cause ±12 of all nosocomial infections in the US, most commonly by Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, and Salmonella spp; less pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae include Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Erwinia, Hafnia, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia spp. See Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Hafnia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, Salmonella, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia.

Enterobacteriaceae

(en´tərōbak´tir´ēā´sēē´),
n.pr a family of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that includes both normal and pathogenic enteric microorganisms such as
Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, and
Salmonella.

Enterobacteriaceae

a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria (order Eubacteriales) occurring as plant or animal parasites or as saprophytes. Includes the lactose-fermenting genera of Escherichia, Enterobacter, Serratia and Klebsiella, and the apathogenic genera, Citrobacter and Erwinia. Also includes the nonlactose fermenters with pathogenic significance, Salmonella, Proteus and Yersinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the collection periods (2004–2005, 2007–2008, 2009–2010, 2011–2012, 2013–2014), Enterobacteriaceae isolates exhibited distinctively different antimicrobial susceptibilities to tested antibiotics.
The prevalence of carbapenemase genes and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from uve teaching hospitals in central China.
The plates were then covered, inverted and incubated at 37[degrees]C for 24 hours, after which the plates with colonies (those surrounded by a purple zone of growth) were counted as Enterobacteriaceae using a colony counter; the results obtained were recorded [12, 14].
In our study, a trend of increase in colistin resistance rate was observed among Enterobacteriaceae family members, from 6.
In vitro susceptibilities of non- Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with intra-abdominal infections in the Asia-Pacific region from 2003 to 2010: Results from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).
To demonstrate the presence of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae over a 4-year period, based on a referral system for confirmation of CPE genes.
Methods: The descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2009 to June 2012 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised non-duplicate clinical carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from different collection units across Pakistan.
Methods: Over a period of one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolates from all clinical specimens with reduced susceptibility to at least one carbapenem were subjected to MHT and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of the NDM-1 gene.
However, the rates of PMQR carriage vary considerably in ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (mostly E.
The aerobic plate count, Enterobacteriaceae count and lactic acid bacteria count increased significantly at each sampling at 5, 11, 17 and 24 days of storage.