Enterobacter


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Enterobacter

 [en″ter-o-bak´ter]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are widely distributed in nature and occur in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. They are frequently a cause of nosocomial infections.

Enterobacter

(en'tĕr-ō-bak'tĕr),
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods. The cells are peritrichous, and some strains have encapsulated cells. Glucose is fermented with the production of acid and gas. The Voges-Proskauer test result is usually positive. Gelatin is slowly liquefied by the most commonly occurring forms (Enterobacter cloacae). These organisms occur in the feces of humans and other animals and in sewage, soil, water, and dairy products; recognized as an agent of common nosocomial infections of the urinary tract, lungs, or blood; somewhat resistant to antibiotics. This genus characteristically acquires resistance rapidly in part because of the presence of inducible β-lactamases; the type species is Enterobacter cloacae.

Enterobacter

/En·tero·bac·ter/ (en´ter-o-bak″ter) a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, widely distributed in nature and occurring in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Species including E. aero´genes, E. agglo´merans, E. cloa´cae, and E. gergo´viae, are frequently the cause of nosocomial infection, arising from contaminated medical devices and personnel.

En·ter·o·bac·ter

(en'tĕr-ō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods. The cells are peritrichous, and some strains have encapsulated cells. Glucose is fermented with the production of acid and gas. The Voges-Proskauer test result is usually positive. These organisms occur in the feces of humans and other animals and in sewage, soil, water, and dairy products; recognized as an agent of common nosocomial infections of the urinary tract, lungs, or blood; somewhat resistant to antibiotics. This genus characteristically acquires resistance rapidly, in part because of the presence of inducible beta-lactamases. The type species is E. cloacae.

Enterobacter

a genus of straight gram-negative rods, lactose-fermenting bacteria of the tribe Klebsielleae of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Found chiefly in the environment in water and soil but are common invaders of tissues in contaminated wounds of animals and in opportunistic infections such as cystitis and pyelonephritis in cattle. E. aerogenes (syn. Klebsiella mobilis) is occasionally a cause of bovine mastitis, uterine infections in mares and the mastitis-metritis-agalactia syndrome in sows.

Enterobacter cloacae
occasionally isolated from dogs and cats with septicemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
coli and Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were the main pathogens followed by Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella.
According to the recommendation by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization, reconstitution of powdered infant formula with water that is no less than 70 degrees Celsius can significantly inactivate Enterobacter sakazakii.
In this respect, results of Al-Turki (23) reinforced the present results where he revealed that microbiological water quality results showed that 20% of the samples examined are contaminated with coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter aerogenes), indicating the necessity of water-sanitation of Hael's water prior to use.
Thus, it was not possible to conclude that fosfomycin was effective in treating KPC-producing Enterobacter, although this approach has been described previously by our group.
Enterobacter cancerogenus strain has been indicated in which of the following conditions?
Klebsiella, Proteus, Serratia, Enterobacter, and Escherichia coli) that can cause invasive disease but generally have been susceptible to a variety of antibiotics.
Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by Enterobacter strain B-14 and its use in bioremediation of contaminated soils.
Further analysis demonstrated that ST171 was associated with a Tn4401 variant within a pBK30683-like plasmid; however, various other plasmids in Enterobacter spp.
The most frequent bacteria causing neonatal sepsis are Klebsiella pneuomoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus.
The following nonpathogenic strains were used for reference experiments: Escherichia coli DH5-Alpha (DH5[+ or -]), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) E2348/69, Citrobacter rodentium DBS 13 (Citrobacter DBS 13) and Enterobacter cloacae.