alien

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alien

an organism, usually a plant, that is not native to the environment in which it occurs, and that is thought to have been introduced by man.
References in periodicals archive ?
131) The court concluded that the constitutional safeguards available to criminal defendants did not apply, noting that whoever "joins the forces of an enemy alien surrenders th[e] right to constitutional protections.
Like the controversial Enemy Alien Act of 1798, the declarations technically pertained only to citizens not born in the United States.
As a matter of cosmopolitan form, the relationship with an enemy alien differs from public to private, as does the definition of enemy alien.
The Supreme Court, in rejecting arguments by the Solicitor General that judicial access through a writ of habeas corpus was precluded by the Presidential Proclamation, stated that "neither the Proclamation nor the fact they are enemy aliens forecloses consideration by the courts of petitioners' contention that the Constitution and laws of the United States constitutionally enacted forbid their trial by military commission.
An opinion piece by Walter Lippmann, "the most influential columnist and preeminent liberal intellectual of the day," raised concern about "the enemy alien problem on the Pacific Coast, or much more accurately, the fifth column problem," as Lippmann described it.
Pursuant to the Enemy Alien Act of 1798, an enemy alien (or alien enemy) was defined as a person above the age of fourteen, born in a country at war with America, then residing in the United States but not a naturalized citizen?
The court of appeals reversed, holding that "any person, including an enemy alien, deprived of his liberty anywhere under any purported authority of the United States is entitled to the writ if he could show that extension to his case of any constitutional rights or limitations would show his imprisonment illegal[.
Alter Pearl Harbor, the United States declared that Americans of Japanese ancestry were considered 4C--the Selective Service Commission designation for enemy alien.
Once denounced as an enemy alien, today Fred Korematsu was now the recipient of the highest civilian honour for his courage in trying to force a nation, even during a time of war, to adhere to the principles of the Bill of Rights.
The court stated, "[i]f a hearing had been provided, and the executive, after a hearing in accordance with law, had decided as a fact that a person was an enemy alien, then, of course, under abundant authority, the court would not have power to oppose its own conclusion as to the fact against that of the executive.
Cole points out that this type of detention--what we might call group detention--originated in 1798 with the Enemy Alien Act.