endosymbiosis

(redirected from Endosymbiotic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

endosymbiosis

(ĕn′dō-sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n.
A symbiotic association in which one or more organisms live inside another, such as bacteria in human intestines.

en′do·sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

endosymbiosis

(ĕn″dō-sĭm″bē-ō′sĭs) [″ + ″]
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms in which one lives within the body of the other.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimating population size and transmission bottlenecks in maternally transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria.
In the unlikely event the medical "genomics revolution" of personalized medicine ever seems to have run out of nuclear DNA markers to consider, a shift in focus to the tiny DNA remnants of an eons-old endosymbiotic event may prove a source of further patient-specific information relevant to diagnosis and effective treatment of diseases.
No evidence for an endosymbiotic bacterial origin of tetrodotoxin in the newt Taricha granulosa.
Like tubeworms, clams, and many other vent animals, the mussels harbor endosymbiotic bacteria, but they also have a digestive system and can catch and eat food.
In the 3 thrips species with literature records of endosymbiotic bacterial associations, it has generally been argued that the bacteria are facultative, and acquired from the environment through feeding (de Vries et al.
The antibiotic activity against the endosymbiotic bacteria isolated from R.
Inside nodules rhizobia are modified into the endosymbiotic form of bacteroids and fix atmospheric nitrogen, providing the host plant with ammonium.
In the 1920s Ivan Wallin in his book "Symbionticism and the Origins of Species" (36) extended the concept of symbiogenesis to mitochondria, a concept reformulated in 1966 in the context of Darwinian evolution by Lynn Margulis as her modern Endosymbiotic Theory in: "Life did not take over the globe by combat, but by networking" (37).
Crustaceans have evolved to host certain endosymbiotic organisms in their digestive tracts (Zimmer et al., 2001).
She said that Wolbachia was maternally transmitted, gram-negative endosymbiotic bacterium that infected more than 65% of all insect species and approximately 28% of the surveyed mosquito species.