endosymbiotic theory

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endosymbiotic theory

n.
A theory stating that the eukaryotes evolved through a process whereby different types of free-living prokaryotes became incorporated inside larger prokaryotic cells and eventually developed into mitochondria, chloroplasts, and possibly other organelles.

endosymbiotic theory

the proposition that symbiosis between different prokaryotes gave rise to eukaryotic cells.
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He implicitly argues that individuals who accept the mainstream interpretation of the large body of evidence that argues in favor of the endosymbiont theory do so because of a predisposed atheistic bias.
This convenient dismissal of the endosymbiont theory ignores the deep molecular similarities between modern mitochondria and chloroplasts and members of specific groups of extant eubacteria; similarities that have little to do with their chemistry.
Discussions of the endosymbiont theory sometimes focus on suites of character states, or even particular extant taxa, as ancestor models for mitochondria or host cells, or both.
From this perspective, the endosymbiont theory must take into account not only the benefits of the interaction between the host and symbiont but the costs as well, and this cost-benefit analysis must consider the relevant units of evolution, in this case the two types of cells.