Endoscope

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endoscope

 [en´do-skōp]
an instrument used for direct visual inspection of hollow organs or body cavities. Specially designed endoscopes are used for such examinations as bronchoscopy, cystoscopy, gastroscopy, and proctoscopy. Although the design may vary according to the specific use, all endoscopes have similar working elements. The viewing part (scope) may be a hollow metal or fiber tube fitted with a lens system that permits viewing in a variety of directions. There is also a light source, power cord, and power source. Accessories that might be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes include suction tip, tubes, and suction pump; forceps for removal of biopsy tissue or a foreign body; biopsy brushes; an electrode tip for cauterization; as well as a video camera, video monitors, and image recorder.

en·do·scope

(en'dō-skōp),
An instrument for the examination or surgical manipulation (for example, biopsy, resection, reconstruction) of the interior of a canal or hollow viscus.
[endo- + G. skopeō, to examine]

endoscope

(ĕn′də-skōp′)
n.
An instrument for examining visually the interior of a bodily canal or a hollow organ such as the colon, bladder, or stomach.

en′do·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
en′do·scop′ic·al·ly adv.
en·dos′co·py (ĕn-dŏs′kə-pē) n.

endoscope

A semirigid or flexible device with a long firm coil that is inserted into the region of interest, which has a light source, an optical system for viewing mucosa, camera, and a channel that allows insertion of sampling devices–eg alligator forceps, cup forceps, or curette for obtaining biopsies or surgical instruments to perform simple–minor surgeries. See Needle endosope, Sigmoidoscope, Stereoendoscope.

en·do·scope

(en'dŏ-skōp)
An instrument for the examination of the interior of a tubular or hollow organ.
[endo- + G. skopeō, to examine]

endoscope

An internal viewing instrument. Modern endoscopes are steerable, flexible, cylindrical instruments with fibre optics for illumination and viewing and channels to allow washing of the area under view, suction, gas inflation to ease viewing, the taking of BIOPSY specimen and the use of various small operating instruments, including LASERS.

Endoscope, endoscopy

An endoscope as used in the field of gastroenterology is a thin flexible tube which uses a lens or miniature camera to view various areas of the gastrointestinal tract. When the procedure is performed to examine certain organs such as the bile ducts or pancreas, the organs are not viewed directly, but rather indirectly through the injection of x-ray dye. The performance of an exam using an endoscope is referred by the general term endoscopy. Diagnosis through biopsies or other means and therapeutic procedures can be done with these instruments.

endoscope

Instrument designed to examine cavities which are not accessible for direct examination with the eye. It usually incorporates fibre optics to increase the flexibility of the instrument. Examples: a laryngoscope which is introduced through the mouth to examine the larynx; an ophthalmic endoscope to examine the intraocular structures by inserting a fibre optics system through the sclera, as may be used in ocular surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
The arachnoid was opened, and the endoscope cannula was inserted together with 0[degrees] or 30[degrees] endoscopes to capture panoramic views of the neurovascular structures.
Light from the endoscope can pass through the body, but it usually scatters or bounces off tissues and organs rather than travelling straight through.
Endoscope (0 degree and 45 degrees, 4 mm wide and 18 cm long).
An alternative is fibre endoscopes based on "multimode" fibres.
The double-balloon endoscope, a type of one-lumen forward-viewing endoscope, has gained popularity recently, as it is associated with a high success rate of ERCP [6, 7], though it is not available nationwide in our country.
Massachusetts is home to numerous companies such as Precision Optics that are developing optical technologies, endoscopes and medical devices.
Bosses said the pounds 500,000 unit based at Clatterbridge Hospital will lead the way in endoscope sterilisation.
There is also the risk of contamination of the flexible endoscope from improper storage and transportation of the flexible endoscopes in containers which are not clean and contain potential contaminants.
The letter stressed that the company was not aware of any reports of an infection or disease transmission associated with the proper use of the System 83 Plus, and that it was safe and effective for cleaning and high-level disinfection of flexible endoscopes "when used in accordance with its labeling." The System 83 Plus machines have been used to reprocess several million flexible endoscopes over the past 20 years, according to the letter.
Pediatric rigid endoscopes (2.7 mm wide) of 0[degrees], 30[degrees], and 70[degrees] were used in this study; a pediatric scope was preferred to the adult scope (4.0 mm wide) because it leaves ample room for an instrument to manipulate the ossicles and because it is associated with a lower risk of damage to the skin of the external auditory canal.
Endoscopes are often costly and require additional equipment to obtain good results, as they are traditionally bulky and difficult to use.
Today's medical practitioners rely on flexible endoscopes for a variety of diagnoses ranging from those involving colon-related illnesses to sinus ailments.