endometrioid tumor

(redirected from Endometrial stromal tumors)

en·do·me·tri·oid tu·mor

a tumor of the ovary containing epithelial or stromal elements resembling tumors of the endometrium.

en·do·me·tri·oid tu·mor

(en'dō-mē'trē-oyd tū'mŏr)
A tumor of the ovary containing epithelial or stromal elements resembling tumors of the endometrium.
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References in periodicals archive ?
CD10 typically shows diffuse, strong staining in endometrial stromal tumors (endometrial stromal nodule and low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma), whereas expression of smooth muscle actin (SMA), desmin, muscle-specific actin (MSA), and h-caldesmon is characteristically seen in smooth muscle tumors.
Endometrial stromal tumors may also express cytokeratins (CK AE1/AE3 cocktail and various individual cytokeratins) focally or diffusely, (105) which may lead to erroneous classification as an epithelial neoplasm (Figure 15, A through D).
4 Currently, the 2003 World Health Organization (WHO) classification divides endometrial stromal tumors (EST) into 3 different subsets2:
A clinical and pathological study of 53 endometrial stromal tumors.
The classification of endometrial stromal tumors (ESTs) has also undergone several revisions.
In the ensuing review, we will discuss these recent developments that are impacting the daily practice of surgical pathology of uterine corpus, with emphasis on (1) endometrial carcinomas, (2) endometrial stromal tumors, (3) uterine smooth muscle tumors, and (4) histologic artifacts associated with minimally invasive gynecologic surgery.
Uterine smooth muscle tumors are differentiated from endometrial stromal tumors by their reactivity with the smooth muscle markers desmin, h-caldesmon, and SMA.
Endometrial stromal tumors are relatively uncommon, and they may pose a diagnostic dilemma at times.
He was concerned that highly cellular leiomyomas were prone to be misdiagnosed as endometrial stromal tumors.
Endometrial stromal tumors, especially undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma (UES), should be considered in the differential diagnosis.
Finally, a wide range of mullerian neoplasms are know to arise in association with endometriosis, including endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma, endometrial stromal tumors, adenosarcoma, and carcinosarcoma (54,55); these diagnostic possibilities must be excluded in cases of extensive endometriosis.