Endometrial polyps

Endometrial polyps

A growth in the lining of the uterus (endometrium) that may cause bleeding and can develop into cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The growing female geriatric population is also projected to propel the growth of the hysteroscopy market as women aged 65 years and above are more prone to postmenopausal complications such as endometrial polyps. The growing adoption of office hysteroscopy is also expected to fuel the growth of the hysteroscopy systems market.
These under-diagnosed cases were first called as normal endometrium (4), a couple of endometrial polyps including one depicting atypia confined to the polyp, and a single case of chronic endometritis.
These experts discuss the factors that incur increased risk for malignant endometrial polyps, the relationship between chronic endometritis and endometrial polyps, whether the etonogestrel subdermal implant can treat EIN, and new endometrial ablation technology
Trans-vaginal sonography may be used initially in the detection of endometrial polyps and other uterine pathology.5 However, polyps may be better visualised during saline infusion sono-hysterography (SIS), in which saline is used to distend the uterine cavity to readily reveal polyps as smoothly margined focal lesions that protrude into the endometrial cavity.
Endometrial polyps and hyperplasia are other common causes3.
If intracavitary pathology, such as submucosal fibroids or endometrial polyps, is suspected, additional imaging with saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) should be performed.
Objective: To find out the clinical effects of post hysteroscopic progesterone hormone therapy in the treatment of endometrial polyps in terms of clinical outcome and the expression of endometrial Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF).
[6] The most common aetiologies associated with abnormal uterine bleeding are leiomyomas, endometrial polyps, adenomyosis, anovulation, disorders of haemostasis and neoplasia.
Endometrial Polyps were 8% and Atrophic Endometrium was 7%.
She said that obesity can also aggravate symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse, stress urinary incontinence and increase the risk of endometrial polyps and symptomatic fibroids.
Other possible etiologies of AUB in adolescents and young women include thyroid dysfunction, polycystic ovarian syndrome, bleeding associated with pregnancy (i.e., abortion or ectopic pregnancy), gestational trophoblastic disease, uterine leiomyoma, endometrial polyps, cervicitis, genital tract trauma, and bleeding disorders (i.e., von Willebrand disease, thrombocytopenia, or clotting factor deficiency) [1].