medical directive

(redirected from End-of-Life Decisions)
A specific and comprehensive advance care document developed for a person which addresses and tries to anticipate that person’s health care needs at the end of his life
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medical directive

End-of-life decisions A specific and comprehensive advance care document–being developed for health care at the end of life. See Advance directive, Durable power of attorney, Living will.
Medical Directive–optimal components  
Introduction Provides an explanation of the document's purpose
Paradigmatic scenarios Provides examples that help the individual understand various illness circumstances and evaluate the types of life-sustaining interventions that might be employed; the PSs would–in theory–help the individual designate his/her preferences with respect to specific treatments
Proxy decision-maker Section provides details on who would make the decisions in the event of the individual becoming mentally incompetent
Organ donation Yes/no, what, to whom, for what
Personal statement The individual's 'wrap-up'
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Susan McLane Memorial Garden at Hospice House was named for Kuster's mother, Susan McLane, who served in the New Hampshire Legislature for 25 years, and was instrumental in ushering-in legislation that paved the way for what we now know as "advanced directives"--binding agreements meant to ease the burden of end-of-life decisions, and to hospice services.
These would bar UCSF employees and students from providing abortion care, contraceptives, fertility treatments, sterilization, physician-assisted end-of-life decisions and gender-affirming treatment for transgender patients.
For Assemblyman Burzichelli, in particular, with whom I have met to discuss this issue, this bill has been a personal fight for years," said Murphy adding; "Allowing terminally ill and dying residents the dignity to make end-of-life decisions according to their own consciences is the right thing to do.
I read and re-read Jennifer Ouellettes mindful speech in acceptance of the 2018 Humanist of the Year Award ("The Ending Needs Work: Humanist Can Lead on End-of-Life Decisions," N/D 2018).
Nick Adams, general manager of national accounts for Mitsubishi Caterpillar Forklift America, says that in addition to economics and safety, flexibility is one of the three main categories that influence end-of-life decisions.
"Making Faithful Decisions at the End of Life" will help practicing Christians to use biblical and theological perspectives regarding death to inform end-of-life decisions, consider where they stand on withdrawing life support and supporting death with dignity laws, and take steps in planning for their own future.
prepared for end-of-life decisions, including advance medical
There will be exhibits featuring information about health and wellness, housing, Medicare, insurance, aging-in-place and end-of-life decisions. Exhibitors will include Neighborhood Services Organization, Sunbeam Family Services, Around the Clock Home Care, Village at Oakwood Assisted Living, Concordia Life Care Community, Grace Living Centers and Metropolitan Library System.
Professor Engel also introduces approaches that other nations have taken in organizing and paying for healthcare and offers insights on ethical quandaries around end-of-life decisions, neonatal care, life-sustaining treatments, and the limits of our ability to define death.
The opening section offers 12 chapters on general concepts such as ICU policies, ethics, judicial involvement in end-of-life decisions, and sharing difficult news with patients and families.
[4] End-of-life decisions are complex for any healthcare worker, especially for the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse, as they have to shift the treatment from aggressive life-saving therapy to end-of-life care.
Do doctors (https://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=15777514628045960849&hl=en&as_sdt=6&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr) advising patients about (http://law.justia.com/cases/new-mexico/supreme-court/2016/35-478.html) end-of-life decisions have to worry about criminal prosecution if a patient stops taking medicine and dies as a result?