medical directive

(redirected from End-of-Life Decisions)

medical directive

a general term for documents that provide direction on the type of care a person desires. See also advance directive, living will.
A specific and comprehensive advance care document developed for a person which addresses and tries to anticipate that person’s health care needs at the end of his life

medical directive

End-of-life decisions A specific and comprehensive advance care document–being developed for health care at the end of life. See Advance directive, Durable power of attorney, Living will.
Medical Directive–optimal components  
Introduction Provides an explanation of the document's purpose
Paradigmatic scenarios Provides examples that help the individual understand various illness circumstances and evaluate the types of life-sustaining interventions that might be employed; the PSs would–in theory–help the individual designate his/her preferences with respect to specific treatments
Proxy decision-maker Section provides details on who would make the decisions in the event of the individual becoming mentally incompetent
Organ donation Yes/no, what, to whom, for what
Personal statement The individual's 'wrap-up'
References in periodicals archive ?
The nine-month course trains students how to handle a variety of complex issues dealing with futility and moral distress, end-of-life decisions and medical research.
The opening section offers 12 chapters on general concepts such as ICU policies, ethics, judicial involvement in end-of-life decisions, and sharing difficult news with patients and families.
html) end-of-life decisions have to worry about criminal prosecution if a patient stops taking medicine and dies as a result?
Her decision prompted a nationwide discussion of assisted suicide and a patient's right to make end-of-life decisions.
This same systematic process of service can bring important services to the person who is facing end-of-life decisions.
Giving patients a greater voice in end-of-life decisions has helped control health care costs in states such as Oregon, where nursing homes and hospices routinely provide a comprehensive approach to end-of-life decisions.
But she also believes that the church must provide guidance for those who are thinking through such end-of-life decisions.
The book ends with the touching story of an 8g-year-old Japanese man who, after watching a video about how to make end-of-life decisions, says that it was the first time in his life anyone had asked him what he wanted.
But as an only child, she became responsible for their end-of-life decisions.
Over the years, many nurses have pointed out the moral distress that goes with the role of the nurse advocate and have called for an environment in which ethical dilemmas involving futile care and end-of-life decisions can be handled in a practical and inclusive way (Efstathiou & Clifford, 2011).
D2 also noted that in 2011 Delegate Morhaim co-sponsored the successful "Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment" legislation which gave an individual's end-of-life decisions the force of a medical order in Maryland.
Children's palliative care is not yet a specialty in SA, and this issue of CME offers a practical approach to the ethics of end-of-life decisions, basic counselling skills and talking to children, breaking bad news, pain control, and coping with your own potential burnout.