rhyme

(redirected from End rhyme)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to End rhyme: internal rhyme, slant rhyme, Exact Rhyme

rhyme

(rīm)
1. Correspondence in sound of the ends of words, e.g., smell, well, and foretell.
2. A poem in rhyme.
rhyme
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed the majority of the end rhymes in the tale are rhymes with either one or two syllables.
Rhyme is also distinguished according to its position in the poem as follows: end rhyme, in which the rhyme occurs at the ends of lines; internal rhyme, in which at least one rhyme occurs within the line (as in Wilde's " Each narrow cell in which we dwell " ); initial rhyme, in which the rhyme occurs as the first word or syllable of the line; cross rhyme, in which the rhyme occurs at the end of one line and in the middle of the next; and random rhyme, in which the rhymes seem to occur accidentally in any combination of the foregoing, often mixed with unrhymed lines.
This traditional conception thereby treats the typical form of so-called "pure" end rhyme (toenaja koneenaja rifma) of recent times.
As with the approach to Coleridge adopted by Simon Avery's edition, reviewed in last year's Year's Work essay on women poets, Pinch addresses the lesser-known poems such as "Sounds" and "No Newspapers." The analysis is particularly interesting on Coleridge's uneven line lengths, arguing, for example, in the reading of "Sounds" that "line length is determined not by the metrical pattern, but by end rhyme. The line is determined, that is, by how long it takes the line to get around to the final end-rhyme" (p.
From various retreats Mahon laces into a variety of formal challenges, working on translations of both short and long lyrics, two-liners, and the verse letter in which almost all the lines are pentameters clenched by end rhyme. Three of the book's twenty-five poems are only two-lines long, their brevity lending itself to comedy: "Drugs, razors, cameras; Lucozade replaces/ lost energy, even in the strangest cases" ("Heathrow").
Their use of assonance instead of end rhyme was often adopted by such poets as W.H.
Purcell, responding to Diekhoff's study, counts 56 instances of end rhyme separated by only one line, 72 separated by two lines, and 51 separated by three.(7) Once again, this may not seem like a very significant number of rhymed lines, roughly four percent of all the lines of Paradise Lost.
This sees Creeley at his micro-attentive best: there are the ins and outs of "raining, outside, in/this interjurisdictional ..." and the replacement of end rhyme with front rhyme, so that "appropriately" can appropriate something from "approaching." "[I]nterjurisdictional headquarters" might be jargon for a middling state of mind or mood as well as the no-place of an airport.
One almost anticipates end rhyme and rhythm like a hymn.
end rhyme In poetry, a rhyme that occurs in the last syllables of verses, as in stanza one of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening":
The classic qasida is an elaborately structured ode of between 60 and 100 lines (though lengths vary considerably), maintaining a single end rhyme that runs through the entire piece; the same rhyme also occurs at the end of the first hemistich (half line) of the first verse.