consequentialism

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consequentialism

(kon″sĕ-kwen′shă-lizm)
The philosophical doctrine that the correctness of a choice is proven only by what that choice produces, rather than why the choice was made or what the agent intended or hoped might occur.
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References in periodicals archive ?
She plays with ethics, too, when future Devi feeds exam answers to her past self--Mlynowski is asking whether the end justifies the means (it does not).
With respect to defined contribution plans, cross testing is an "end justifies the means" or "benefit justifies the contribution" test.
To condone condom use to pre vent the spread of HIV is to say that the end justifies the means. It's like making exceptions to abortion.
Obama's pragmatic inaugural address confirms that he is governed by the Marxist belief that the end justifies the means - a belief which allows him to support the systematic murder of innocent children through abortion and embryonic stem cell research as if such people were a sub-class of human beings.
Kudos on "The Foley Follies." It took some courage to risk the wrath of some "end justifies the means" readers.
Both Nkrumah and Mugabe share a common political mantra and that is that "the end justifies the means." History is replete with monumental disasters when this credo is followed blindly.
The principle that "the end justifies the means" may achieve short-term goals, but in the long run it will only deepen our divisions and hasten our demise.
They're a disgrace, under the tutelage of a manager determined to practise the doctrine of Machiavelli, that the end justifies the means.
But Romanov defended the decisions made by his father Vladimir that have been taken in the most turbulent year in Hearts' history on the basis that the end justifies the means.
As TEI put in its letter about Announcement 2005-80, "This is not about tax shelters, but about the fundamental nature of [taxpayer rights]." When the IRS (or any agency) loses sight of the need for balance, when the agency seemingly takes the position that the end justifies the means," it invites a strong response, not only from the practitioner community but from Congress and the public at large.
To argue otherwise is to say along with the great criminals of history that the end justifies the means. We support the expediency of principle, not the principle of expediency.
Maybe at some point he fell into the trap of believing the end justifies the means, that it's OK to mislead somebody to get them to say what you need them to say, because the message is more important than how you get the message.