encoding

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Related to Encodings: Character sets

en·cod·ing

(en-kōd'ing),
The first stage in the memory process, followed by storage and retrieval, involving processes associated with receiving or briefly registering stimuli through one or more of the senses and modifying that information; a decay process or loss of this information (a type of forgetting) occurs rapidly unless the next two stages, storage and retrieval, are activated.

encoding

The process in the mental modal model by which long-term memory is formed.

en·cod·ing

(en-kōd'ing)
The first stage in the memory process, followed by storage and retrieval, involving processes associated with receiving or briefly registering stimuli through one or more of the senses and modifying that information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sets of encoding or markup tags which conform to the SGML syntax are known as SGML applications.
The need for standardization of markup in the humanities led to the establishment of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) in 1987.
The TEI immediately made a commitment to SGML and set up four main committees to deal with different aspects of encoding electronic texts.
Although the TEI Guidelines include some 400 different encoding tags, very few indeed are absolutely required.
Many existing texts have encoding within them which is not documented and, if the exact source is not known, it may be impossible to identify, for example, what a group of percent signs in the middle of a text may mean.
The encoding description element provides information which the user of a text needs to know.
The encoding description contains information which anyone who uses the text needs to have.
There seems to have been very little emphasis specifically on electronic text files in the humanities where it is necessary to know whether the text requires specific software in order to use it, or what encoding scheme it uses.
An added benefit of this support is that database performance for SQL databases that contain character data, as opposed to multi-byte national character data, is greatly increased as conversions in encoding can be avoided," Kadhim added.
A runtime option to check for mismatching encoding systems in data shared between programs using COBOL's external data feature.