empirical

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empirical

 [em-pir´ĭ-k'l]
based on experience; determined from experimental data, as opposed to theoretical.

empirical

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Relying on or derived from observation or experiment: empirical results that supported the hypothesis.
b. Verifiable or provable by means of observation or experiment: empirical laws.
2. Guided by practical experience and not theory, especially in medicine.

em·pir′i·cal·ly adv.

empirical

Medtalk adjective Based on experience or observational information and not necessarily on proven scientific data

empirical

opinion based on experience and observation, but unsupported by scientific proof
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that political objects need not be actual ones; it is sufficient that the one who uses the political concept can refer to some relevant empirical content which is verifiable by other potential users.
Peeling the motivational assumptions off the (implicit) core of abstract maximization yields a "theory" that is without empirical content.
As the cake eater and boycott examples illustrate, normative behavior is often context dependent in a way that is problematic for the empirical content of the neoclassical paradigm.
A similar demise awaited radical reductionism, the doctrine that terms carry their own empirical content.
Two of the latter consider the relevance of the first Critique to the empirical content of natural science, one of them discussing the methodological import of regulative ideas of reason, the other tracing the development of Kant's treatment of causality in his later works.
The Enlightenment strand of modernity is oriented to open-ended evidences; the fundamentalist commitment is to the preservation of the empirical contents of the mediations.