empirical

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empirical

 [em-pir´ĭ-k'l]
based on experience; determined from experimental data, as opposed to theoretical.

empirical

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Relying on or derived from observation or experiment: empirical results that supported the hypothesis.
b. Verifiable or provable by means of observation or experiment: empirical laws.
2. Guided by practical experience and not theory, especially in medicine.

em·pir′i·cal·ly adv.

empirical

Medtalk adjective Based on experience or observational information and not necessarily on proven scientific data
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that political objects need not be actual ones; it is sufficient that the one who uses the political concept can refer to some relevant empirical content which is verifiable by other potential users.
And he attempts to do this by arguing that unless perception provided such reasons, no belief could have empirical content at all.
does not have any excess empirical content compared to the original theory, except that it now takes the discrepant evidence and says it supports a new variant of realism" (pp.
Without this device, language could have no empirical content nor could it ever have any communicative role.
Part 2, "A Theoretical Structure of International Banking in Conditions of Inflation," is even more devoid of empirical content, consisting almost entirely of poorly informed theoretical speculations.
Observation sentences have theory-independent empirical content, and are an exception to the interconnectedness of sentences of the language: they carry stimulus meaning independently of the rest of the language, and are both theory-free and theory-laden.
Glock distinguishes conceptual from alethic and ontological relativism, defend a distinction between conceptual scheme and empirical content, and reject the Davidsonian argument against the possibility of alternative conceptual schemes: there can be conceptual diversity without failure of translation, and failure of translation is not necessarily incompatible with recognizing a practice as linguistic.
Furthermore, to declare that 'the notion of a 'free' float is an abstraction with little empirical content, as few governments are willing to set monetary policy without some consideration of exchange-rate effects' (p.
but these "laws" have virtually zero empirical content.
McAllister's timeless empirical criteria - consistency with extant data, novel prediction, consistency with other successful theories, explanatory power, empirical content and internal consistency - have much in common with the five trans-paradigmatic virtues of accuracy, consistency, scope, simplicity, and fruitfulness favoured by Kuhn.
10) The present section argues that the maximization hypothesis derives its empirical content from these restrictions, that economists therefore must make substantive motivational assumptions, and that they should include moral motivations in their analyses.
Schwartz gives the impression of thinking that the empirical content of the theories with which he is concerned is all that matters.