emotion

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emotion

 [e-mo´shun]
a state of arousal characterized by alteration of feeling tone and by physiologic behavioral changes. The external manifestation of emotion is called affect; a pervasive and sustained emotional state, mood. adj., adj emo´tional. The physical form of emotion may be outward and evident to others, as in crying, laughing, blushing, or a variety of facial expressions. However, emotion is not always reflected in one's appearance and actions even though psychic changes are taking place. Joy, grief, fear, and anger are examples of emotions.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn),
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object and is evidenced in both behavior and in psychological changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

(ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.

emotion

Psychology A mood, affect or feeling of any kind–eg, anger, excitement, fear, grief, joy, hatred, love. See Negative emotion, Positive emotion, Toxic emotion.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest directed toward a definite object and evidenced in both behavior and in psychologic changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

Any state of arousal in response to external events or memories of such events that affect, or threaten to affect, personal advantage. Emotion is never purely mental but is always associated with bodily changes such as the secretion of ADRENALINE and cortisol and their effects. The limbic system and the hypothalamus of the brain are the mediators of emotional expression and feeling. The external expression of emotional content is known as ‘affect’. Repressed emotions are associated with psychosomatic disease. The most important, in this context, are anger, a sense of dependency, and fear.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

Patient discussion about emotion

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotion
References in classic literature ?
Cannon's chief argument against James is, if I understand him rightly, that similar affections of the viscera may accompany dissimilar emotions, especially fear and rage.
Angell in an article called "A Reconsideration of James's Theory of Emotion in the Light of Recent Criticisms."* In this article Angell defends James's theory and to me--though I speak with diffidence on a question as to which I have little competence--it appears that his defence is on the whole successful.
Sherrington, by experiments on dogs, showed that many of the usual marks of emotion were present in their behaviour even when, by severing the spinal cord in the lower cervical region, the viscera were cut off from all communication with the brain, except that existing through certain cranial nerves.
Angell suggests that the display of emotion in such cases may be due to past experience, generating habits which would require only the stimulation of cerebral reflex arcs.
Angell's conclusion, after discussing the experiments of Sherrington and Cannon, is: "I would therefore submit that, so far as concerns the critical suggestions by these two psychologists, James's essential contentions are not materially affected." If it were necessary for me to take sides on this question, I should agree with this conclusion; but I think my thesis as to the analysis of emotion can be maintained without coming to.
According to our definitions, if James is right, an emotion may be regarded as involving a confused perception of the viscera concerned in its causation, while if Cannon and Sherrington are right, an emotion involves a confused perception of its external stimulus.
She had begun her confession under the subduing influence of Dorothea's emotion; and as she went on she had gathered the sense that she was repelling Will's reproaches, which were still like a knife-wound within her.
She put out her hand to Rosamond, and they said an earnest, quiet good-by without kiss or other show of effusion: there had been between them too much serious emotion for them to use the signs of it superficially.
Oh, would we could relate it everywhere, and to every one, so that the emotion of our unknown benefactor might reveal his presence."
"Alas," cried Monte Cristo, striving to repress his emotion, "if Lord Wilmore was your unknown benefactor, I fear you will never see him again.
It wasn't that they were cruel, or meant to hurt, or even stupid exactly; but she had always found that the ordinary person had so little emotion in his own life that the scent of it in the lives of others was like the scent of blood in the nostrils of a bloodhound.
He looked at them again, and, very strangely, for he was so used to thinking that he seldom saw anything, the look of them filled him with a simple emotion of affection in which there were some traces of pity also.