Goldman

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Gold·man

(gōld'măn),
Henry M., U.S. periodontist, 1911-1980. See: Goldman-Fox knives.

Gold·man

(gōld'măn),
David E., 20th-century U.S. physiologist. See: Goldman equation, Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For her contemporary, Emma Goldman, de Cleyre was simply "this most gifted and brilliant anarchist woman America ever produced" (Goldman [1932] 2005, 29; Huberman 2006, 72).
Emma Goldman was jailed in 1893 for "aiding and abetting an unlawful assembly" alter a speech at an unemployment rally in New York.
I have always appreciated Emma Goldman for her lack of sectarian narrowness; in the breadth of her interests--literary and artistic as well as political--and in the personalism of her loyalties, she exemplified the difference between generous anger and narrow fanaticism.
As American anarchists, we are even a little proud of the fact that ours was the first considerable political movement in the country to be led by a woman, Emma Goldman of Rochester.
Mencken, and others made almost an industry of such attacks; Randolph Bourne characterized Puritanism as "a case of arrested development," and Emma Goldman condemned it as "killing what is natural and healthy in our impulses.
He takes his intellectual inspiration from Noam Chomsky and Emma Goldman.
She provided a smorgasbord of commentary on, variously, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Arnold Bennett (she called him one of her literary "uncles"), Lord Beaverbrook (one of her lovers), Janet Flanner (a New Yorker colleague), Emma Goldman, John Gunther (another lover), Violet Hunt, Fannie Hurst, D.
If anything, he may draw too broadly from the Barnes-Coleman correspondence, but this serves to suggest that the figure of Emily Coleman (secretary to Emma Goldman, experimental prose writer, later a convert to the Catholic Worker Movement) deserves a hearing and a biography of her own.
Based on Bolt's successful play of the same name, the opera tells the story of the anarchist Emma Goldman, who lectured throughout the U.
Emma Goldman, the Jewish anarchist who lived for a time in Toronto, defied convention both in her personal life and in her challenges to women.
In its role of the excluded other, the sentimental becomes the unconscious of modernism, which (as any repressed) returns, this time in the work of modernist women writers: Emma Goldman, Edna St.