Emla cream

Emla cream

A brand name for a mixture of LIGNOCAINE (lidocaine) and PRILOCAINE formulated as a cream for local application to allow many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to be carried out with minimal pain or discomfort. The name is an acronym for ‘Eutetic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics’.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cryotherapy treatment protocol was as follows: EMLA cream was applied to the keloid 1 hour before treatment.
To alleviate this momentum, medical practitioners may apply a local anaesthetic cream (EMLA) known as EMLA cream on paediatric patients in order to reduce their pain during medical procedures (13).
Analgesic EMLA cream (a mixture of local anesthetics such as lidocaine 2.5%/ prilocaine 2.5%) is easy to use but is minimally effective in relieving circumcision pain, (6) although some investigators have reported it is efficacious compared with placebo.
have compared the administration of vapocoolant spray, EMLA cream, and placebo cream during venous cannulation among patients undergoing hemodialysis.
"EMLA cream or some form of topical anesthetic can be helpful, but the provider must remain mindful of the maximum safe amounts to apply as outlined in the package insert."
(1) Intervention groups received 0.25 to 10 mL (median, 2 mL) of 12% to 75% sucrose or 30% to 40% glucose orally 2 minutes before one to 4 injections (one study used 3 oral doses every 30 seconds, and one study added topical EMLA cream).
They put Emla cream (a topical anesthetic) but it didn't work on me.
This suggests that the proportion of unsuccessful LPs in unsedated patients was reduced when EMLA cream was used, but the numbers using EMLA were small and the reduction was not statistically significant (p=0.15; RR 0.73 (95% CI 0.46-1.16)).
They concluded that, the application of EMLA cream for at least 90 minutes plus 1% lignocaine infiltration optimized patient comfort for epidural insertion.14
However, the availability of EMLA cream, light general anaesthesia or sedation during and after the procedure, availability of reports mentioning less haemodynamic effects due to spinal anaesthesia ultimately have encouraged the present-day anaesthesiologists to consider spinal anaesthesia more frequently for their paediatric patients.
We could find no reports documenting the efficacy of EMLA cream in a field setting for the management of pain related to short procedures.