emetic

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Related to Emetics: Antiemetics, ipecac

emetic

 [e-met´ik]
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that does this; examples are a strong solution of salt, mustard water, powdered ipecac, and ipecac syrup. Emetics should not be used when lye or other strong alkalis or acids have been swallowed, since vomiting may rupture the already weakened walls of the esophagus. Examples of such acids and alkalis are sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), potassium hydroxide (caustic potash), and carbolic acid. Emetics should also be avoided when kerosene, gasoline, nail polish remover, or lacquer thinner has been swallowed, since vomiting of these substances may draw them into the lungs.

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik),
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, for example, ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic

/emet·ic/ (ĕ-met´ik)
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that causes vomiting.

emetic

(ĭ-mĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Causing vomiting.
n.
An agent that causes vomiting.

e·met′i·cal·ly adv.

emetic

[imet′ik]
1 adj, pertaining to a substance that causes vomiting.
2 n, an emetic agent. Apomorphine hydrochloride, acting through the central nervous system, induces vomiting 10 to 15 minutes after parenteral administration. Syrup of ipecac is used in the emergency treatment of some drug overdosages and in certain cases of poisoning.

emetic

Herbal medicine
A herb used to induce vomiting; emetics include ipecac (Cephaelis ipecacuanha), lobelia (Lobelia inflata) and mustard seed (Brassica juncea).

emetic

Therapeutics Any agent that causes vomiting

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic

Any substance that causes vomiting.

Emetic

A medication or substance given to induce vomiting.
Mentioned in: Poisoning

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, e.g., ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]

emetic (əmet´ik),

n a drug that induces vomiting.

emetic

1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that causes vomiting. A strong solution of salt (1 tablespoon to 1 cup of water), mustard water (1 tablespoon to 1 cup of water), and powdered ipecac or ipecac syrup are examples of emetics. In dogs, commonly in need of such treatment, apomorphine may be used.

emetic factor
an agent, probably deoxynivalenol, produced by Fusarium graminearum and found in mold-affected grain. Causes vomiting and food rejection in pigs fed the grain. Called also vomitoxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same convict establishment, Archibald Robertson, surgeon to the Cumberland hulk, trialled both treatments, and 'deeply lamented' having trusted them, especially since his treatment plan of oral hydration of cold water, mustard emetics, calomel and venesection had been working.
They found that incidences of emetic episodes were 20% in ondansetron group and 7% in granisetron group, which is clinically significant (P <0.
The use of oral granisetron versus intravenous ondansetron for antiemetic prophylaxis in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery: the effect on emetic symptoms and quality of recovery.
23) Many other drugs (apart from emetic chemotherapeutic regimes) are known to cause nausea--some at therapeutic doses, eg opioids, and some in toxicity, eg digoxin.
There is some evidence that vestibular inputs modify the emetic response from other stimuli: a history of motion sickness is a risk factor for development of PINV, PONV and CINV.
To prevent delayed emesis in patients receiving cisplatin and other high emetic risk agents, dexamethasone and aprepitant is recommended on day 2 and 3 as well.
During the emetic phase, the goal is to rapidly terminate the episode, preferably within 1 hour of onset.
Emetic episodes were assessed between two groups by calculating percentage of patients with no emesis, 1 episode, 2 episodes and >2 episodes of emesis.
For chemotherapy with high emetic risk, the guidelines recommend starting antiemetics before chemotherapy each day that chemotherapy is given.
Intraoperative and postoperative emetic episodes were recorded by direct questioning or by spontaneous complaints by the patients at any time during the study period--which was defined as the period starting from the anaesthetic procedure to the first 5 (five) hours in the immediate postoperative period.