embryonic stem cell

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embryonic stem cell

totipotent cells composing the inner cell mass of the blastocyst.

embryonic stem cell

Abbreviation: ES cell
A cell from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst (the 3-5 day old mammalian embryo) that can give rise to all the somatic cells of the body. Embryonic stem cells can be maintained as pure stem cell cultures.
See: adult stem cell
See also: cell

embryonic stem cell (ESC)

1. A cell taken from an early embryo and intended for therapeutic application of its totipotential property.
2. A cell derived from an embryo resulting from a donated egg whose nucleus has been removed and replaces by a cell from a prospective patient. During pregnancy some ESCs pass across the placental barrier and enter the mothers bloodstream. There are suggestions that these stem cells may repair damaged maternal organs, including the brain. Cells can be derived from umbilical cord blood that appear to have most of the properties of ESCs.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We've been hearing that, since we now have iPS cells, we don't need to continue embryonic stem cell research. There's a perception that iPS cells arc 'democratizing' the field because they are fairly straightforward to work with from a technical point of view."
Meanwhile, Oregon legislators are pushing through a bill requiring Oregon taxpayers to fund unsuccessful embryonic stem cell research (House Bill 2598).
-- A majority of Americans likely support President Barack Obama's executive order Monday doing away with the rules on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research that were in place under the Bush administration.
"We will lift the ban on federal funding for promising embryonic stem cell research," Obama said to vigorous applause at a White House gathering.
Federal funding of embryonic stem cell research also has the ability to bring some light to a recession-dimmed picture for R&D funding in 2009.
Pro-lifers worked diligently in opposition to the initiative and to bring the truth to the publicthat embryonic stem cell research has not led to any treatments, that there are successful alternatives being used now, and that ambiguities in the amendment's wording actually remove all restric-tions to embryonic stem cell research and could lead to human cloning.
Brazil's Supreme Court has ruled that scientists can conduct embryonic stem cell research, which holds the promise of curing Parkinson's disease and diabetes, but raises ethical concerns about the limits on human life.
We were told that cures would be seen from embryonic stem cell research for diseases such as Parkinson's and MS, and now from hybrids we are told that cancer and heart disease, along with the others previously mentioned, might be the way forward to finding cures.
Currently, embryonic stem cell research is denied public funding by law but the Bush administration's position on umbilical cord blood stem cell research is less clear.
On the other hand George Bush and the USA have banned federal funding for such research and have supported ethical stem cell research using non human embryonic tissue, which is making embryonic stem cell research increasingly redundant.
The debates on both adult and embryonic stem cell research were dominated by the opposition parties, primarily the Canadian Alliance, which later merged with the Progressive Conservatives to become the Conservative Party, without any significant response from the governing party.
Today, embryonic stem cell research stands out as a critically important issue about which we have neither ethical consensus nor clear, comprehensive regulation.