waiting period

(redirected from Elimination period)
Also found in: Legal, Financial.

waiting period

Managed care
The time a person must wait from the date of acceptance into an eligible class of insurance or from application, to when the insurance becomes effective.

Medicare
The time between when a person signs up with a Medigap insurance company or Medicare health plan and when the coverage starts.
 
Medspeak-UK
See Waiting time.

Social medicine
The time a family spends waiting to adopt a child from the time of application to placement.

waiting period

Managed care The time a person must wait from the date of acceptance into an eligible class of insurance or from application, to when the insurance becomes effective. See Elimination period.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same 55-year-old individual purchasing a long-term care policy with a monthly benefit of $4,500 (for 3 years, with 5 percent compounded automatic inflation protection, a 90day elimination period for facility care, and a zero-day elimination period for home health care) has an initial pool of $162,000.
Russia and the US, for their part, would be dismantling from their starting points many more warheads than the other nuclear weapon states; but due to arsenal size the US and Russia would still, as today, be possessors of a large (though diminishing) majority of the world's nuclear weapons through most of the weapons elimination period.
The elimination period can be as short as 30 days or as long as one year.
This is the length of time that benefits will be paid once the elimination period has been satisfied.
While many companies require a two-year waiting period from the time the annuity is purchased before benefits kick in, followed by a 90-day elimination period, State Line opted to limit payout of benefits to just a seven-day elimination period (90 days for Annuity Care II annuitants), Moon said.
8) A deductible, in the form of an elimination period, will generally last from 0 to 180 days.
The elimination period is 90 regular season days, the first 45 of which must be consecutive.
Some policies have an elimination period (the patient has to be disabled for a certain period of time before becoming eligible for payments).
The elimination period (often thought of as a deductible) is the length of time before the insurance policy begins to pay benefits.
Following an elimination period, or waiting time during which no benefits are paid and the client may recover, benefits begin.
The length of time between the onset of a disability and eligibility for benefits is called the elimination period; the longer the elimination period, the lower the premium.
Generally, gaining an understanding of the policy structure involves becoming familiar with the choice of maximum daily benefit, the benefit length, the type of inflation benefit, as well as the elimination period.

Full browser ?