electrophoresis

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electrophoresis

 [e-lek″tro-fo-re´sis]
the movement of charged particles suspended in a liquid on various media (e.g., paper, gel, liquid) under the influence of an applied electric field. adj., adj electrophoret´ic. The various charged particles of a particular substance migrate in a definite and characteristic direction—toward either the anode or the cathode—and at a characteristic speed. This principle has been widely used in the separation of proteins and is therefore valuable in the study of diseases in which the serum and plasma proteins are altered. The principle also has been applied in the separation and identification of various types of human hemoglobin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·lec·tro·pho·re·sis

(ē-lek'trō-fōr'ē-sis),
The movement of particles in an electric field toward an electric pole (anode or cathode); used to separate and purify biomolecules.
See also: electropherogram.
[electro- + G. phorēsis, a carrying]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

electrophoresis

(ĭ-lĕk′trō-fə-rē′sĭs)
n.
1. The migration of charged colloidal particles or molecules through a stationary medium under the influence of an applied electric field usually provided by immersed electrodes. Also called cataphoresis.
2. A method of separating substances, especially proteins, and analyzing molecular structure based on the rate of movement of each component in a colloidal suspension while under the influence of an electric field.

e·lec′tro·pho·ret′ic (-rĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

electrophoresis

Lab methods A method of separating large molecules–eg, DNA fragments or proteins from a mixture of similar molecules, by passing an electric current through a medium containing the mixture; each molecule travels through the medium at a different rate, depending on its electrical charge and size; agarose and acrylamide gels are media commonly used electrophoretic media
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·lec·tro·pho·re·sis

(ĕ-lek'trō-fŏr-ē'sis)
The movement of particles in an electric field toward anode or cathode.
See also: electropherogram
Synonym(s): ionophoresis, phoresis (1) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

electrophoresis

Separation of charged particles in a solution (ions) by the application of an electric current. This can be done in a thin layer of solution on paper or in a gel. Ions of low weight move more quickly than those of high weight, so separation occurs and can be demonstrated by staining. The method is widely used in medicine to identify and measure the proteins present in the blood including the ANTIBODIES (IMMUNOGLOBULINS). It is used to identify the various abnormal haemoglobins causing SICKLE CELL ANAEMIA and other similar conditions. It is extensively used in genetic work such as DNA fingerprinting. Electrophoresis is remarkably sensitive. Pieces of DNA, for instance, that differ in length from each other by only one base pair can be separated into discrete bands by this method.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

electrophoresis

a method for separating particles with different electrical charges, for example, amino acids, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. The apparatus consists of a supporting medium soaked in a suitable buffer with an electrical field set up across it. The mixture to be separated (e.g. blood proteins) is placed on the supporting medium. The components with different charges then separate from each other and their eventual position is compared with the position of known standards.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Electrophoresis

Use of an electrical field to separate proteins in a mixture (such as blood or urine), on the basis of the size and electrical charge of the proteins.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·lec·tro·pho·re·sis

(ĕ-lek'trō-fŏr-ē'sis)
The movement of particles in an electric field toward anode or cathode.
Synonym(s): ionophoresis, phoresis (1) .
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The electrophoretic mobility for each of the derivatives at optimized conditions and at different pH was calculated from the obs erved migration times as reported [29].
polonicum (As304) 230-7-1 whose electrophoretic mobility was between 1By8 and 1Dy12 which were the HMW-GSs of Chinese Spring.
As previously discussed, such differences could be related to differences in electrophoretic mobility between certain proteins, depending on which technique is used.
In EMN method, electric field exposure induced an increase in electrophoretic mobility of cell nuclei (EMN index), decreased numbers of heterochromatin granules near the inner membrane of cell nucleus, and induced cell membrane damage; but cell viability was conserved.
Electrophoretic mobility of the clay fractions, artificial mixtures, and adsorbed mineral samples was measured in the pH range 3.0-7.5 with 0.01 M NaCl as the background electrolyte (Osei and Singh 1999).
The POD isozyme patterns were characterized by different electrophoretic mobility and Rf values ranging from 0.27 to 0.78.
Instruments capable of laser light scattering measurements are valued for their ability to perform first principle measurements of macromolecular electrophoretic mobility. However, traditional light-scattering instruments have problems characterizeing proteins and other nanoparticles that are less than 5 nm in size.
Finally, the treated agarose gel was viewed by an Alpha Innotech AlphaImager IS-2200 system, and the stained HA samples were analyzed by Alpha Innotech AlphaEase Spot Density software for electrophoretic mobility measurement.
Figures 1 and 2 show electrophoretic mobility patterns of R-PE conjugated whole Sh[alpha]M Ig and F(ab')2 fragment of Sh[alpha]M Ig by SMCC linker in SDS-PAGE, respectively.
Comparison of electrophoretic mobility shifts of the DNA-protein complexes from the expressing M46 stains and non-expressing M46 stains may give insight on the reason for lack of expression from stains G184AS and G217B.