surveillance

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surveillance

 [sur-vāl´ans]
1. watching or monitoring.
2. a procedure used instead of quarantine to control the spread of infectious disease, involving close supervision during the incubation period of possible contacts of individuals exposed to an infectious disease.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making.
surveillance: community in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of data for decision-making in the community.
surveillance: late pregnancy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of maternal-fetal data for treatment, observation, or admission. See also pregnancy.
surveillance and/or observation a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action through which the nurse examines and monitors physical and behavioral responses to disease or injury and to the prescribed medical and/or nursing therapy.
surveillance: remote electronic in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition of patient data via electronic modalities (telephone, video conferencing, e-mail) from distant locations as well as interpretation and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making with individuals or populations. See also telehealth.
surveillance: safety in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing collection and analysis of information about the patient and the environment for use in promoting and maintaining patient safety.
skin surveillance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the collection and analysis of patient data to maintain skin and mucous membrane integrity. See also skin care.
surveillance (omaha) in the omaha system, an intervention on the first level of the intervention scheme, defined as nursing activities of detection, measurement, critical analysis, and monitoring to indicate client status in relation to a given condition or phenomenon.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lănts),
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, or rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

surveillance

(1) The ongoing observation of the health of individuals or populations.
(2) The monitoring of diseases that have a known prevalence in a population.
(3) The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

surveillance

Epidemiology
1. The monitoring of diseases that have a certain prevalence in a population.
2. The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data. See Epidemiologic surveillance, Fluoride surveillance, Health surveillance, HIV surveillance, Immunosurveillance, Medical surveillance, Public health surveillance, Sentinel surveillance, Site-specific surveillance.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. Collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It is likewise a federal crime to use or disclose any information acquired by illegal wiretapping or electronic eavesdropping. Violations can result in imprisonment for not more than five years; fines up to $250,000 (up to $500,000 for organizations); in civil liability for damages, attorneys' fees and possibly punitive damages; in disciplinary action against any attorneys involved; and in suppression of any derivative evidence.
London's biggest problem, however, is how to explain the situation to the Americans who have indicated that they are worried about electronic eavesdropping or, worse, a terrorist attack and do not want any Chagossians or their dependants on Diego Garcia or, indeed, any of the 65 islands in the archipelago.
As head of the NSA--the American electronic eavesdropping organization--the 61-year-old oversaw the program, which allows for the monitoring of international calls and e-mails of "terrorist suspects" inside the US without a warrant.
"A growing number of corporate deals are conducted in hotels and the dangers of electronic eavesdropping in such easy-access venues should not be underestimated," said Talk Safe UK director Roger Bescoby.
The recent National Security Agency INSAI practice of "data mining" differs from its former electronic eavesdropping program in that it
Paranoia is rife, with frequent allegations of electronic eavesdropping. For this reason, communications are often encrypted.
The Dynasound DS2500 Soundmasker Series protects windows, doors, and walls against human and electronic eavesdropping techniques.
But a little paranoia is a healthy thing, as Kofi Annan may be thinking right now, at a time when electronic eavesdropping has never been easier or cheaper.
Early within the first chapter, surveillance is defined as the "covert observation of people, vehicles and premises." It is here that the authors differentiate physical surveillance, which involves direct visual observation, from technical surveillance, which involves the use of electronic eavesdropping equipment.
The University of Colorado-Boulder, for one, set a first-week-of-2003 deadline for encrypted authentication of all e-mail, telnet, and FTP sessions, with the goal of ensuring that no username-password pairings are sent over the network as plain text, which is vulnerable to theft via electronic eavesdropping.
The Court distinguished the surreptitious recordings made in this case from the more traditional "'electronic eavesdropping'...when devices have been used to enable government agents to overhear conversations which would have been beyond the reach of the human ear." (12) Because the agent was a party to the recorded conversations, there was no Fourth Amendment violation that would warrant exclusion of the tapes.
(43) Though Title III originated as a crime control statute, the legislative history reveals congressional awareness of electronic eavesdropping in the domestic realm.

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