beta decay

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Related to Electron emission: thermionic emission

beta decay

Low-level radioactive decay in which particles, usually an electron with an antineutrino, or less commonly a positron with an antineutrino, are emitted.
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References in periodicals archive ?
where j(T) is the current density of field electron emission while temperature is T(A/[cm.sup.2]), and N (T) is the coefficient of correction when temperature is T (K) relative to when temperature is 0 K, which is given as
The fourth difference in the MCCT is that complete projection data can be acquired if the electron emission points are densely distributed in the X-ray source.
Sometimes multiple gases, such as cesium and barium, are used for enhanced electron emission and transport.
As a comparison, secondary electron emission (SEE) measurements were made on the surface of the different materials by electron spectroscopy chemical analysis (ESCA).
Prokhorov, "Scanning tunnelling microscopy: application to field electron emission studies," Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, vol.
Residual gases are required to produce a plasma and the subsequent positive ions that bombard the cathode and generate the needed electron emission density.
In 1988, researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., developed ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM), a new method for investigating microscopic details of the interface between metals and semiconductors.
Over five chapters the author covers the optical nature of a charged particle beam, geometrical optics, wave optics, particle scattering, and electron emission from solids.
Such a conduction mechanism due to electron emission from the metal to the dielectric is called thermionic emission or Schottky emission.
The phenomenon of low-field electron emission for such materials cannot be explained by the classical Fowler-Nordheim (FN) theory, so a few principally different emission models were proposed for them in the past years [7-16].
The core principle behind scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is secondary electron emission. Electron beam scans an object causing it to emit secondary electrons, which form a pattern that produces a 3-D image.