electromagnet

(redirected from Electromagnets)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

electromagnet

 [e-lek″tro-mag´net]
a temporary magnet made by passing an electric current through a coil of wire surrounding a core of soft iron or steel.

e·lec·tro·mag·net

(ē-lek'trō-mag'net),
A bar of soft iron rendered magnetic by an electric current encircling it.

electromagnet

/elec·tro·mag·net/ (e-lek″tro-mag´net) a temporary magnet made by passing electric current through a coil of wire surrounding a core of soft iron.

electromagnet

A type of magnet used in MRI using coils of wire, typically wound around an iron core, that become magnetised with current flow.

electromagnet

a piece of metal rendered temporarily magnetic by passage of electricity through a coil surrounding it.
References in periodicals archive ?
All SE Series 7000 Suspended Electromagnets are backed by Eriez' exclusive five year coil warranty the longest in the industry
The coil design and the subsequent power draw are the two first order variables in the design of the electromagnet and the projected magnetic field.
Suppose the turns of a single electromagnet are N, the pole area is A, and the magnetic permeability of vacuum is [[mu].
Electromagnets are similar to other magnets in that they attract metal objects, but the magnetic pull is temporary.
solves several of these problems by displacing both conventional electromagnet technology and tritium-based approaches to fusion.
In 1996, our Rotary Burnand Company has celebrated 100 years of business as a leading manufacturer of electromagnets and magnetic equipment, setting standards for design, manufacture and service.
But placing electromagnets on the gearbox disables the spy in the cab technology - allowing the drivers to flout the law.
The coupling between the two groups of electromagnets is regarded as disturbance and suppressed by enhancing the robustness of individual controllers.
Electromagnets will ensure smooth acceleration at both high and low speeds, higher carrier ability to launch aircraft.
These experiments yielded a spherical surface: the next step would be to create a paraboloid with the right combination of electromagnets.
Superconductors use far less energy than electromagnets because they recirculate electrical current without any losses.
THE WORLD'S largest science experiment at Cern has begun cooling its 27km ring of electromagnets to near absolute zero temperatures in anticipation of its planned summer start-up.