Coulomb's law

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Coulomb's law

Etymology: Charles A. de Coulomb
(in physics) a law stating that the force of attraction or repulsion between two electrically charged bodies is directly proportional to the strength of the electrical charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
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The increased voltage induced a stronger electrical force on the drop to the counter electrode.
Chun (8) spun polyester fibers from the melt in air using a combination of electrical force and mechanical force from a take-up spool.
Instead of laser light, the Georgia Tech tweezers apply magnetic and electrical forces to the biological sample being studied.
Electrical forces applied to a charged particle affect the time it takes for the metallic ion to move through an electrolytic solution.
Holding an atom still long enough to take its photo, while remarkable in itself, is not new technology; the atom is isolated within a chamber and held in free space by electrical forces.
American and British teams have tried measuring the constant another way, by balancing gravity's force on a mass with the electrical forces needed to suspend it in midair, but repeated trials gave inconsistent measures of the constant.
During operation, rotating equipment experiences dynamic stress caused by hydraulic, mechanical or electrical forces that induce vibrations and contribute to both aging and wear of machines.
electrical forces, instead, hold the planets in orbit and hold everything down on the earth's surface.
Experiments were conducted to assess whether aerosolized bacteria, including spores, respond like particulate contaminants to electrical forces in indoor air.
Modern scientific knowledge now tells us that most minerals are composed of a variety of different sorts of atoms glued together by electrical forces to produce molecules.
Probing for more knowledge about the phenomenon, Michael Faraday showed that electrical forces could produce motion and create lines of force.
That is the procedure during which electrodes are patched to a patient's chest to examine 12 views of electrical forces in his heart.