electric charge

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Related to Electric charges: electric field, law of electric charges

electric charge

The state of any particle or body on which the there is an imbalance between electrons and protons. An excess of electrons causes a negative charge; a deficiency of electrons causes a positive charge. Electric charge, ELECTRIC FORCE and ELECTRIC POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE are fundamental to much of physiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Negative (-) electric charges build up at the bottom of clouds.
But they, like water droplets, are capable of electrifying in ascending air currents and further participation in the processes of accumulation and separation of electric charges in atmospheric storm clouds.
where r, c, [z.sub.1], [z.sub.2] are, respectively, the distance between the charges, the velocity of light, and the number of the electric charges.
Because of this imbalance, scientists have long suspected that forces due to electric charges could change the freezing point of water.
After performing the analysis, an increase of the deposit layers adhesion can be noticed in the case of the tests where powders cladded with electric charges were used in the metallization process.
They work by sending a small electric charge between two metal probes when they are pushed into the wall.
Arrhenius's theory of ionic dissociation (see 1884) made it look as though atoms or groups of atoms could carry electric charges. What's more, it looked as though atoms or atom groups would carry charges of different sizes that were related to each other in ratios of exact whole numbers.
The electromagnetic interaction is an interaction between electric charges. The strong interaction is an interaction between color charges.
3 a: What types of electric charges do you need to create electricity?
The microscopic details of how electric charges move through transistors and other devices made of such materials have remained obscure, however.
Static electricity (the buildup of electric charges) in her hair!
Considering two pointlike electrically charged objects with masses [M.sub.1], [M.sub.2], electric charges [Q.sub.1], [Q.sub.2], and distance r, we can unify Newton's law of gravity and Coulomb's law of electric force by the following single expression of the interaction between complex energies