flexion

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flexion

 [flek´shun]
1. the act of bending or the condition of being bent.
2. in obstetrics, the normal bending forward of the head of the fetus in the uterus or birth canal so that the chin rests on the chest, thereby presenting the smallest diameter of the vertex.
plantar flexion bending of the toes or foot downwards toward the sole.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn), [TA] Avoid the misspelling flection.
1. The act of flexing or bending, for example, bending of a joint to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine so that the concavity of the curve looks forward.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

/flex·ion/ (flek´shun) the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion

(flĕk′shən)
n.
1. also flection Anatomy
a. The act of bending a joint or limb in the body by the action of flexors.
b. The resulting condition of being bent.
2. A part that is bent.

flexion

[flek′shən]
Etymology: L, flectere, to bend
1 a movement allowed by certain joints of the skeleton that decreases the angle between two adjoining bones, such as bending the elbow, which decreases the angle between the humerus and the ulna. Compare extension.
2 a resistance to the descent of the fetus through the birth canal that causes the neck to flex so the chin approaches the chest. Thus the smallest diameter (suboccipitobregmatic) of the vertex presents.
enlarge picture
Flexion and extension of the elbow

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending, e.g., bending of a joint so as to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
See: open-packed position (2)
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

1. The act of bending of a joint or other part or the state of being bent.
2. Pertaining to a bent part as in flexion deformity.

flexion (flekˑ·shn),

n movement of a limb to decrease the angle of a joint.
Enlarge picture
Flexion.
flexion, bilateral sacral,
n condition in which the sacrum has rotated around a central transverse axis so that the sacral base moves forward between the bones of the pelvis. Also called
sacral base anterior.
flexion, craniosacral,
n movement characterized by ascending motion of the sphenobasilar symphysis and backward motion of the sacral base.
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Flexion, craniosacral.
flexion, sacral,
n anterior movement of the sacral base relative to the hip bones.
flexion, SBS,
n rotation of the occipital and sphenoid bones in opposing directions about parallel transverse axes, thus resulting in superior positioning of the basilar portion of both bones and an increase in the posterior convexity between them. Also called
sphenobasilar synchondrosis (symphysis) flexion.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
Synonym(s): open-packed position (2) .
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion reflex
see flexor reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
The participants performed two repetitions of each elbow flexion task.
23,63-66) Although tenodesis may increase elbow flexion strength, it does not restore supination strength.
0 ms, respectively, showing a trend of more reduced td in the patients with stroke than in the nondisabled controls and a trend of reduction in td with decreasing elbow flexion (Figure 4(e)).
Advancement is also not allowed if simultaneous shoulder elevation and elbow flexion occur instead of elbow extension.
The results of the study showed greater reaching abilities during avatar feedback compared with video game feedback, suggesting the need for custom-designed video games that target the specific impairments, in this case, the abnormal coupling between shoulder abduction and elbow flexion.
Based on previous studies with stroke patients, one can expect that gravity compensation increases range of motion of the upper limb [12,14] because of the positive effect on pathological muscle synergies between shoulder abduction and elbow flexion [14].
At the time of the latest follow-up, elbow flexion, extension, pronation, and supination were measured using a goniometer.
When the target muscles are adequately reinnervated, patients with transhumeral amputation are expected to be able to independently and intuitively control elbow flexion (musculocutaneous nerve) and extension (proximal radial nerve) from their natural, undisturbed lateral biceps and medial triceps muscles.
Incline Dumbbell Curl (IDC) and Dumbbell Preacher Curl (DPC) are two variations of the standard DBC, generally applied to optimize biceps brachii contribution for elbow flexion by fixing shoulder angle at a specific value.
An effort should be made to increase elbow flexion when it is less than 105[degrees].
A series of unilateral elbow flexion muscle contractions (30 repetitive contractions followed by 3 sets x 15 contractions) was performed at 20% of 1RM with varying levels of external compression (0 (without compression), 98, 121, and 147 mmHg external compression) around the upper arm.
The arm is suspended in both 90[degrees] of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion.