Eisenmenger's syndrome


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Related to Eisenmenger's syndrome: tetralogy of Fallot, Eisenmenger complex, Victor Eisenmenger

Eisenmenger's syndrome

 [i´zen-meng″erz]
ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis due to right-to-left (reversed) shunt of blood. Sometimes defined as pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary vascular disease) and cyanosis, with the shunt being at the atrial, ventricular, or great vessel area.

Eisenmenger's syndrome

[i′sən·meng′ərz]
Etymology: Victor Eisenmenger, German physician, 1864-1932
ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis resulting from right-to-left (reversed) shunt of blood. It is sometimes defined as pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis with the shunt being at the atrial, ventricular, or great vessel area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts and Eisenmenger's syndrome.
Once Eisenmenger's syndrome is established, the murmur may disappear owing to the right- and left-side pressures being equal.
3] have reported a case of Eisenmenger's syndrome posted for cleft lip surgery who was successfully managed with general anesthesia by induction with thiopentone and maintenance with isoflurane and vecuronium.
Untreated Eisenmenger's syndrome in turn can develop into the classic Hippocratic syndrome.
For her 11-year-old daughter Kimberley is suffering from Eisenmenger's Syndrome, which will cut her life tragically short.
People who have Eisenmenger's syndrome are usually born with a large hole in the heart.
Brave Jasmin Adam, six, of Billingham, pictured with mum Melissa and brother Max, two, is set to face life in a wheelchair because of the debilitating condition Eisenmenger's Syndrome.
Over time, the pulmonary vascular resistance increases, and the magnitude of the left-to right intracardiac shunting decreases; eventually, the shunt may become right to left with the development of arterial hypoxemia (Cyanosis) leading to Eisenmenger's syndrome.
In this article the authors report on a rare clinical entity: a giant pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) due to an even more rare condition--a late diagnosed atrial septal defect (ASD) resulted in Eisenmenger's syndrome.
Surgical closure of the ASD was not considered due to established Eisenmenger's syndrome and it was decided to follow-up medical treatment with calcium channel blockers and anticoagulation.