Ehret

Eh·ret

(e-rā'),
Heinrich, early 20th-century German physician. See: Ehret phenomenon.
References in periodicals archive ?
is pleased to announce the addition of Jim Ehret to its leadership team.
carcharias y ha propuesto el nuevo genero Carcharocles para clasificar el tiburon megalodonte, argumentando la evolucion convergente como la razon principal para la similitud de los dientes de ambas especies (Casier, 1960; Glickman, 1964; Capetta, 1987; Ward & Bonavia, 2001; Nyberg et al, 2006; Ehret et al, 2009, 2012; Pimiento et al., 2010).
Ehret, the Bauers, Margaret Mee and Pandora Sellars, reflecting the diversity of global flora.
Nashville jumped out to a 14-0 lead in the first quarter after touchdowns by Jullian Metcalf and Luke Ehret.
According to ODW Elektrik's CEO Martin Ehret, the home regulations being aligned with the European ones and the institutional support were curial for their decision to invest more.
"People ask me [if the megalodon is still alive] every day," Dana Ehret, an assistant curator at the New Jersey State Museum, recently told (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/articles/real-science-megalodon-180969860/) Smithsonian Magazine .
Ehret, "Genetics of hypertension," in Hypertension: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease E-Book, p.
Aidan DeGarmo, Allica Derry, Hannah DesChamp, Sarah Diess, Samantha Donovan, Alex Dupre, Riley Edmondson, Stormie Ehret, Kaleo Ettel, Calah Feuerstein, Stefan Fields, Alexander Finch, Jeffery Flores, Clayton Fritts, Gabriel Galyon, Rosa Garcia Contreras, Madison Glenn, Tevin Goddard, Marcos Godinez-Martinez, Devin Godley, Abigail Griego, Juan Guerrero Romero, Alexis Guillen, Erika Guillen-Mora,
(1985) and is highly abundant in exposed and sheltered rocky habitats of the northeast Pacific (Hui 1992, Cassone & Boulding 2006), some studies describe Pachygrapsus crassipes as an herbivore or scavenger, consuming primarily diatom films, algae (e.g., Ulva spp.), and detritus (Hiatt 1948, Barry & Ehret 1993).
Ulrike Ehret notes that these Catholics were members of the social elites of imperial and Weimar Germany.
Ulrike Ehret shows that the Catholic right fully embraced anti-Semitic ideas and made them "an integral part of [its] worldview" (225).
In that respect, it is somewhat surprising to see that one of the key themes of such an agenda is presented in the introduction as part of an emerging consensus: the famous 'reversal of fortune' thesis, which holds that Africa not only lost ground in relative terms after 1450 (see the chapter by Ehret), but also has suffered from an absolute economic decline (Inikori's chapter) as it was swallowed by processes of globalization.