eggshell

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egg·shell

(eg'shel),
The calcareous envelope of a bird's egg.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eggshell

(ĕg′shĕl′)
n.
The thin, often brittle exterior covering of the egg of a bird or reptile.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the replacement (50%) of limestone with egg shell, the replacement (50%) of limestone with oyster shell (Cufadar, 2014), and the replacement (100%) of limestone with whelk shell in laying hen rations (MacIsaac et al., 2016) decreased feed intake without affecting egg weight.
Attention should be paid on a generally small number of bacterial colonies found on the egg shells. It is several times smaller than reported by other authors (Nowaczewski et al., 2013) and may indicate high microbiological purity of eggs and stock from which the eggs were obtained.
Chicken egg shell is a well-organized structure, incorporating different soluble and in soluble proteins and minerals which is later used by the developing embryo.
Marugan-Lobon, "Morphometric analysis of dinosaur egg shells: constraints of size on shape," Historical Biology, vol.
After tossing the egg shells and the plastic jug into the appropriate boxes, Joshua repeated, "Wow." Then he returned to the kitchen and stated, "The Jones family is certainly helping the environment."
While in horizontal transmission disease is penetrated during or after ovipositor through the egg shell from the gut or contaminated feces (Aoust et al., 2000).
Apart from standard calcium salts HAp can also be produced from some natural sources of calcium like sea corals [7], egg shells [8-9], sea shells [10] and also from body fluids [11].
coli, coliform and Salmonella bacteria are examples of food born disease agents transmitted to people from contaminated egg shells.
They were forced to eat maggots, egg shells and dead birds to survive.'
Finally, no more walking on egg shells! She talks about voices regained in a place free from violence.
However, many species of insects developed resistance to DDT, it proved to be highly toxic toward fish, and it was responsible for the near-extinction of several bird species because of its interference with the formation of egg shells. For these reasons and because of its environmental persistence, the use of DDT was banned in the United States in 1972.
Greens have targeted DDT ever since Rachel Carson's Silent Spring (1962) testified to its possible role in thinning bird egg shells. DDT was one of 10 chemicals marked for banning in the United Nations Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), signed in May by 93 governments.