vasa efferentia

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Related to Efferent ducts: head of epididymis, caput epididymis

vas

 [vas] (pl. va´sa) (L.)
vessel. adj., adj va´sal.
vas aber´rans
1. a blind tube sometimes connected with the epididymis; a vestigial mesonephric tube.
2. any anomalous or unusual vessel.
va´sa afferen´tia vessels that convey fluid to a structure or part.
va´sa bre´via short gastric arteries.
vas de´ferens ductus deferens.
va´sa efferen´tia vessels that convey fluid away from a structure or part.
va´sa lympha´tica lymphatic vessels.
va´sa prae´via the presentation, in front of the fetal head during labor, of the blood vessels of the umbilical cord where they enter the placenta.
va´sa rec´ta re´nis long U-shaped vessels arising from the efferent glomerular arterioles of juxtamedullary nephrons and supplying the renal medulla. Called also arteriolae rectae renis.
va´sa vaso´rum the small nutrient arteries and veins in the walls of the larger blood vessels.

vasa efferentia

The secretory ducts of the testis to the head of the epididymis.
See also: vasa
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References in periodicals archive ?
Estrogens, produced from testosterone by the aromatase enzyme in Leydig and germ cells and found at high concentrations in the seminal fluid, also play a role in the mammalian efferent ducts and epididymis (Hess and Carnes, 2004); in contrast, in teleosts, estrogens seem to control renewal and proliferation of spermatogonia (Amer et al., 2001; Kobayashi et al., 2011).
In rat Sertoli cells, AQP4 and -9 interact with the [Cl.sup.-]/HC[O.sub.3.sup.-] transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) (Jesus et al., 2014a, b); and it is believed that this interaction contributes to the control of the seminiferous tubular secretion, as is suggested to occur in the epididymis (see Mammalian efferent ducts and epididymis below).
The efferent ducts are the major sites of water reabsorption (up to 90%) entering the lumen from the seminiferous tubules (Clulow et al., 1998).
Anatomically, the epithelium of the efferent ducts is classified as pseudostratified columnar and is composed of ciliated, nonciliated, and basal cells (Hess, 2002).
In mammals, the efferent ducts are connected to the epididymis, a highly coiled tube where 55%-65% of total sperm is stored (Turner, 1995; Robaire et al., 2006).
Products of the kininkallikrein system such as bradykinin might also regulate AQP9 expression in the rat efferent ducts and epididymis through a calcium-dependent mechanism (Belleannee et al., 2009).
Efferent ducts, epididymis, and vas deferens: structure, functions, and their regulation.
On the mechanism for flow in the efferent ducts. J.
The efferent ducts connect the rete testis with the epididymis.
As they make their way through the efferent ducts and head of the epididymis, the fluid is absorbed by the mucosal epithelium, causing the concentration of spermatozoa to increase.
Unlike the epididymis and efferent ducts, the ductus deferens has a well-defined tunica serosa.