efferent

(redirected from Efferent arterioles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

efferent

 [ef´er-ent]
1. conducting or progressing away from a center or specific site of reference, such as an efferent nerve; called also centrifugal. See also afferent and corticifugal.
2. a fiber or nerve that so conducts.

ef·fer·ent

(ef'ĕr-ent), Do not confuse this word with afferent. Avoid the mispronunciation ē'fe-rent, sometimes adopted to emphasize the contrast of afferent.
Conducting fluid or a nerve impulse outward from a given organ, cell, or part thereof, for example, the efferent connections of a group of nerve cells, efferent blood vessels, or excretory duct of an organ.
[L. efferens, fr. effero, to bring out]

efferent

(ĕf′ər-ənt)
adj.
1. Directed away from a central organ or section.
2. Carrying impulses from the central nervous system to an effector.
n.
An efferent organ or body part, such as a blood vessel.

ef′fer·ent·ly adv.

efferent

adjective Conveying away from the center of an organ or structure

ef·fer·ent

(ef'ĕr-ĕnt)
Conducting outward from an organ or part; e.g., the efferent connections of a group of nerve cells, efferent blood vessels, or the excretory duct of an organ.
[L. efferens, fr. effero, to bring out]

efferent

1. Directed away from a central organ or part.
2. Nerve impulses travelling away from the central nervous system to a peripheral effector.

Efferent

Refers to peripheral nerves that carry signals away from the brain and spinal cord. These nerves carry out motor and autonomic functions.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

efferent

Carrying nervous impulses away from the central nervous system to the periphery. See afferent.

ef·fer·ent

(ef'ĕr-ĕnt)
Conducting fluid or nerve impulse outward from a given organ, cell, or part thereof.
[L. efferens, fr. effero, to bring out]

Patient discussion about efferent

Q. Where do you go for health information? Where do you go to get health advice besides here on imedix?

A. googeling can be very helpful but you may encounter hundreds of unreliable web sites that who knows who opened them. so i use the link above and i really like websites of big organizations ("national association of neurosurgeons" type of thing..), this website, wrongdiagnosis.com is also very good...there are quite a few...

Q. will it ever go??? I have acne on my face for several months, and although I went to see a dermatologist and treat it, I still have these ugly pimples and zits on my face. I feel really ugly and sometimes I don't want to go to school, and just want to stat at my room not let anyone see me. Will it ever go away? What should I do?

A. Acne usually abates and disappears with time, but the chances for that depends on the specific type and features of the disease. If you still suffer from lesions despite treatment, you should consult your dermatologist and seek further help.

Q. Should I go for the knife? I have essential tremor for many years, and in the last few years it seems nothing helps it, and although I tried all the drugs my doctor could offer me, nothing helps. It really ruins my life, and recently I read about a surgery that suppose to treat it, called thalamotomy- does anyone know anything about it?

A. It's a possibility, and considered effective (reducing tremor in most of the patients). However, it has quite serious side effects, that can result even in weakness of some parts of your body. You should think really good before you opt for this treatment. Good luck!

More discussions about efferent
References in periodicals archive ?
Another potent vasoconstrictor of the efferent arteriole is endothelin-1 (ET-1).
It increases activity levels of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide [53-55] leading to vasodilation of the afferent arteriole and augmentation of angiotensin II's actions on the efferent arteriole [56, 57]; these actions collectively contribute to glomerular hyperfiltration [51].
Endothelium-derived relaxing factor/ nitric oxide modulates angiotensin II action in the isolated microperfused afferent but not efferent arteriole. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 91(5), 2012 2019.
The nerve endings terminate in the smooth muscle cells of the afferent and efferent arterioles. Direct stimulation of the adrenergic receptors at these locations will result in afferent and efferent arteriolar vasoconstriction.
It is thought that there are endothelin receptors in the renal vessels and that endothelin causes increased vascular resistance in both the afferent and efferent arterioles leading to decreased RBF and GFR.
There appears to be no effect on the efferent arteriole.
As the ascending limb of the loop of Henle moves upward, the initial portion of the DT passes between the afferent and efferent arterioles that proceed or form from, respectively, the glomerulus of that nephron.
These capillary beds are separated by the efferent arteriole. This arrangement, a capillary bed surrounded by arterial vasculature, is referred to as a portal system.