arteriole

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Related to Efferent arteriole: Peritubular capillaries

arteriole

 [ahr-te´re-ōl]
a minute arterial branch. adj., adj arterio´lar.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·te·ri·ole

(ar-tēr'ē-ōl), [TA]
A minute artery with a tunica media comprising only one or two layers of smooth muscle cells; a terminal artery continuous with the capillary network.
Synonym(s): arteriola [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arteriole

(är-tîr′ē-ōl′)
n.
One of the small terminal branches of an artery, especially one that connects with a capillary.

ar·te′ri·o′lar (-ō′lər, -ə-lər) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arteriole

Anatomy A teeny weeny artery that connects arteries with capillaries
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·te·ri·ole

(ahr-tēr'ē-ōl) [TA]
A minute artery with a tunica media comprising only one or two layers of smooth muscle cells; a terminal artery continuous with the capillary network.
Synonym(s): arteriola [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arteriole

A small terminal branch of an artery, intermediate in size between an artery and a CAPILLARY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Arterioleclick for a larger image
Fig. 48 Arteriole . Arterioles, capillaries and venules.

arteriole

any of the narrow, thin-walled arteries that carry oxygenated blood to the tissues from the heart, forming part of the BLOOD CIRCULATORY SYSTEM. Arterioles progressively get smaller as they approach the target tissue, giving offside branches which become capillaries. Some arterioles connect up directly to VENULES via SHUNT VESSELS, particularly in tissues with a constant blood supply such as the skin.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Arteriole

The smallest type of artery.
Mentioned in: Raynaud's Disease
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·te·ri·ole

(ahr-tēr'ē-ōl) [TA]
A minute artery with a tunica media comprising only one or two layers of smooth muscle cells; a terminal artery continuous with the capillary network.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In the vessels, intimal hyaline thickening is present initially and later progresses to arterial hyalinosis of the afferent and efferent arterioles which later leads to glomerular hyperfiltration [18, 19].
ANP induces vasodilation of the afferent 'arteriole and vasoconstriction of the efferent arteriole resulting in an increased GFR.
Efferent arteriole baroreceptors and prestaglandins.
constricting the efferent arteriole to create glomerular back pressure.
The nerve endings terminate in the smooth muscle cells of the afferent and efferent arterioles. Direct stimulation of the adrenergic receptors at these locations will result in afferent and efferent arteriolar vasoconstriction.
As the ascending limb of the loop of Henle moves upward, the initial portion of the DT passes between the afferent and efferent arterioles that proceed or form from, respectively, the glomerulus of that nephron.
ACE-Is decrease glomerular filtration rate through induction of systemic hypotension and the vasodilatory effect on efferent arterioles and may thus increase the risk of developing CIN.
This also contributes to the vasodilation of the afferent and efferent arterioles, supporting the rise in GFR (and consequently, a rise in the amount of sodium filtered).
Superficial nephrons have short loops of Henle that extend only to the outer medullary layer, and their efferent arterioles brandl into peritubular capillaries that surround the nephron segments.
The porous glomerular capillaries rest between the afferent and efferent arterioles (see Figure 2).