effector

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effector

 [ef-fek´ter]
1. an agent that mediates a specific effect, as an allosteric effector or an effector cell.
2. an organ that produces an effect, such as contraction or secretion, in response to nerve stimulation; see also receptor.
allosteric effector one that binds to an enzyme at a site other than the active site.

ef·fec·tor

(ē-fek'tŏr, -tōr),
1. As defined by Sherrington, a peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by muscular contractioon, glandular secretion, or electric discharge (from an electric organ, as in the case of certain bony fishes such as the electric eel).
2. A small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the activity of an operon.
3. A small molecule that binds to a protein or other macromolecule and, in so doing, alters the activity of that macromolecule.
4. An individual or a substance, technique, procedure, or person causing an effect.
[L. producer]

effector

(ĭ-fĕk′tər)
n.
1. A muscle, gland, or organ capable of responding to a stimulus, especially a nerve impulse.
2. A nerve ending that carries impulses to a muscle, gland, or organ and activates muscle contraction or glandular secretion.
3. Biochemistry A small molecule or protein that alters biochemical processes in a cell, as by decreasing or increasing the activity of an enzyme.

effector

An organ, such as a gland or muscle, that responds to a motor stimulation. See Allosteric effector.

ef·fec·tor

(e-fek'tŏr)
1. A peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by contraction (muscle), secretion (gland), or a discharge of electricity (electric organ of certain bony fishes).
2. A small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the activity of an operon.
3. A small molecule that binds to a protein and, in so doing, alters the activity of that protein.
4. A substance, technique, procedure, or individual that causes an effect.
[L. producer]

effector

a structure or organ that brings about an action of'effect’ as a result of a stimulus received through a RECEPTOR which can come from the CNS or from a hormone. The effector is usually a muscle but can be a gland.

ef·fec·tor

(e-fek'tŏr)
1. Peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by muscular contraction, glandular secretion, or electric discharge (from an electric organ, as in the case of certain bony fishes such as the electric eel).
2. Small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the operon activity.
[L. producer]
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of acting as a pathogen, the effectors - adapted over many years of evolution - can now be used to benefit the patient.
Tool changers-like these shown from ATI Industrial Automation-enable faster changeover from one end effector to another.
In the current study, we focused on the interaction of enavatuzumab with tumor cells and immune effector cells.
* the effector must have a planar motion depending on two independent parameters;
The simulations presented here indicate that MP-mediated increases in cAMP are insufficient to substantially activate downstream effectors within the cytosol of PMVECs.
(iv) The target object contacts the end effector and hand cart.
Genetic manipulations of H1.2 levels in T-cell populations are underway to directly envisage the role of H1.2 pathway in promoting survival of T effectors in vivo.
--to verify the solutions for bases and effectors through the inverse structural model characterized by a zero instantaneous degree of mobility;
Distinguishing among effectors, systems, and platforms allows greater flexibility and certainly better adaptability.
Under the partnership, ZIOPHARM will utilise Intrexon's advanced transgene engineering platform for the controlled and precise cellular production of anti-cancer effectors. ZIOPHARM will have rights to Intrexon's entire human in vivo effector platform within the field of oncology which includes two lead clinical-stage product candidates, one which is in an advanced Phase I study and another which will be the subject of an Investigational New Drug (IND) filing during the first half of 2011.
Contributors also address adaptation to the plant apoplast by pathogenic bacteria and specific issues related to Agobacterium (pathogenicity, biocontrol and evolution), Xyella fastidiosa (common genes and genomic breaks), the sugarcane pathogen Leifsonia xyli and Xanthomonas (biological insights based on genome sequencing), enterobacterial plant pathogens, Ralstonia solanacearum and bacterial wilt, Pseudomonas syringae (secretion systems, effector genes and the evolution of virulence), elicitors of innate immunity in plants, bacterial Type III effectors and their plant targets, cyclic Di-GMP signaling and the regulation of virulence, characteristics of native plasmids from plant pathogenic bacteria, and the use of bioinformatics in high-throughput sequencing technology.
Probiodrug AG (Halle Saale, Germany) has patented physiological substrates of mammalian glutaminyl cyclase (QC, EC 2.3.2.5), new effectors of QC, methods for screeing for such effectors, and the use of such effectors and pharmaceutical compositions comprising such effectors for the treatment of conditions that can be treated by modulation of QC-activity.