Edwardsiella

(redirected from Edwardsiella ictaluri)
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Edwardsiella

 [ed-ward´se-el″ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, which are pathogenic for aquatic animals and are occasional opportunistic pathogens for humans; E. tar´da can cause acute gastroenteritis and septic infections.

Edwardsiella

(ed'ward-sē-el'lă),
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing motile, peritrichous, nonencapsulated rods. The type species is Edwardsiella tarda, which is occasionally isolated from the stools of both healthy humans and those with diarrhea, from the blood of humans and other animals, and from human urine. Edwardsiella tarda is an etiologic agent of gastroenteritis in humans. The two other species in this genus are Edwardsiella hoshinae and Edwardsiella ictaluri.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paterson, "Optimum concentration of edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine in feed for oral vaccination of channel catfish," Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, vol.
Dietary immunostimulants enhance non-specific immune responses in channel catfish but not resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, vol.
Klesius, "Effect of soybean meal replacement by cottonseed meal and iron supplementation on growth, immune response and resistance of channel catfish (Ictalurus puctatus) to Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge," Aquaculture, vol.
Sublethal levels of dissolved oxygen, lower than 2 mg [L.sup.-1] compared to a normal level of 6 mg [L.sup.-1], increased the susceptibility of African catfish and Nile tilapia to the infection caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri (WELKER et al., 2007) and S.
Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish.
A major catfish disease caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri, ESC costs catfish farmers as much as $60 million a year in losses.
However, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, fed with elevated vitamin C supplementary diets did not show higher resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri infection (Li et al., 1993).