Jenner, Edward

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Jenner, Edward

(jen′ĕr)
Brit. physician, 1749–1823. Jenner observed that individuals exposed to cowpox, such as milkmaids, would develop a minor skin lesion and then be immune to smallpox. From this observation he developed a vaccine from cowpox lesions, which provides immunity to smallpox.

Jenner, Edward

(1741–1823) English physician who discovered that cowpox lymph matter could be safely used as an inoculum (a VACCINE) to prevent smallpox. The first vaccination was carried out in 1796.
References in periodicals archive ?
Edward Jenner. In 1798 Jenner dedicated to Parry his historic paper on the smallpox vaccination, "An Enquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae (Smallpox) Vaccinae," a publication known to Jane Austen.
Chicago, IL, May 26, 2013 --(PR.com)-- The RE/MAX Hot Air Balloon will pay a June 5 visit to the Edward Jenner Elementary Academy of the Arts, 1119 N.
Recently, VGX-3100 won the Edward Jenner Poster Award First Prize, a prestigious award that recognized the most promising research at the fifth Vaccine and ISV Global Congress, stated the company.
He was at school with Edward Jenner, with whom he maintained a lifelong friendship; indeed, Jenner's classical publication on vaccination in smallpox was dedicated to 'My Dear Friend'.
5 October 2011 - Inovio Pharmaceuticals (AMEX:INO) said on Tuesday that its project for the development of a therapeutic synthetic vaccine for cancer was the winner of the Edward Jenner Poster Award First Prize at the recent 5th Vaccine and ISV Global Congress.
Edward Jenner demonstrated in 1796 that inoculation using fluid from cowpox lesions could safely prevent smallpox.5,6 Jenner's research was initially rejected, but by 1840 the British government provided Jenner's vaccination free of charge.
Other choices include the Longthorpe Tower in Peterborough, where the Middle Ages linger on in the form of a chamber rediscovered after the Second World War, decorated with murals that cover all aspects of medieval existence (the accompanying text adopts the refreshing perspective of encouraging the viewer to see how different people used to be, rather than drawing out the similarities); and Gloucestershire's Edward Jenner Museum, which commemorates the first attempts at vaccination, when Jenner, intrigued by local lore that claimed those who caught cowpox were rendered immune to smallpox, injected his gardener's son with the former, to check the tale's veracity.
Vaccination against infectious diseases was pioneered by Edward Jenner in the 18th century.
English physician Edward Jenner coined the term vaccination in 1796 to describe inserting pus from cowpox lesions into open cuts on human patients to prevent smallpox.
As he runs them through his research into how reanimation of the brain actually works, you wait in vain for anybody to ask the obvious question: "Hey are you related to Edward Jenner who invented a vaccine for smallpox?"
Edward Jenner, an unlucky protagonist, is the hero and goat not only in this follow-up novel, but in the author's excellent "Precious Blood," in which he killed the evil-doer but in the process lost his license as a medical examiner in New York City.
Vaccination, the introduction into the body of an attenuated or killed form (or particle or toxin) of a disease-causing organism to elicit immunity against the disease, has arguably saved more lives globally than any other medical intervention since Edward Jenner conducted the world's first recorded medical trial using cowpox to immunise against smallpox in 1796, and reported his findings to the Royal Society in 1798.