edge effect

(redirected from Edge habitat)
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edge effect

n.
1. The occurrence of greater species diversity and biological density in an ecotone than in either of the adjacent ecological communities.
2. A phenomenon, such as a sandhi rule or cliticization, that happens at the edges of words, phrases, or other linguistic units.

edge effect

the occurrence of a greater diversity and density of organisms at a boundary between habitats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of vegetation structure and edge habitat on the density and distribution of white-footed mice in small and large forest patches.
Moreover, the density and activity of forest animals in edge habitats can also be altered as a consequence of their specific responses to habitat changes, varying from edge avoidance to edge preference (Bowers and Dooley Junior, 1993; Goosem, 2000).
These data support other UC studies documenting minimal impacts of field edge habitat and associated wildlife on farms and food safety issues (Jay-Russell 2013; Karp et al.
This result may be explained by the interference caused by provisioning man-made food by the staff in grass land areas resulting in MMF spending more time on grass land consuming man-made food, subsequently spending less time teaching CMF to forage higher quality bamboo at bamboo edge habitats. In some bird species, offspring that receive low levels of care are less successful and have lower fitness (Kilner et al.
We can define [[rho].sub.0] as the road density at which no interior habitat is left and the natural area is completely replaced by edge habitats. In the case of amphibians, the edge width is d = 25 m (Demaynadier, Hunter 1998; Semlitsch et al.
We found more Florida stone crab in estuarine edge habitats compared with the abundance observed in marsh creek or adjacent ICW habitats (Fig.
Decapod crustaceans accounted for 83% of the total catch across all habitats, with 84% found within the marsh edge habitat. Grass shrimp and postlarval penaeid shrimp accounted for 86% of all decapod crustaceans collected (54% and 32%, respectively).
Such prediction is based on the assumption that host plants which are submitted to a differential microclimatic condition (hygrothermal stress in edge habitat) could be less defended against herbivores.
"In the past 10 years we have developed the PPG Aquarium into a world-class marine environment, reached a benchmark of one million visitors, built the state-of-the-art Water's Edge habitat and now are one of the top 10 zoos in the country."
This, however, could be a reflection of a higher percentage of forest and forest edge habitat in this study (~40 percent) relative to the area surveyed by Vukovich and Monroe (2005) which is described as primarily open grassland.
Streamside, yellow iris and blue flag are greeting fly fishermen, while daisies and multi-flora roses blossom in field and edge habitat.
This association with forest edge could lead to the conclusion that fragmentation in the MBNF has benefited moose since a preference for edge habitat is widely reported across most of the boreal forest (Mastenbrook and Cumming 1989, Thompson and Stewart 1998), northwest Montana (Costain 1989, Matchett 1985), southeastern British Columbia (Poole and Stuart-Smith 2006), and Washington (Base et al.