endocrine disruptor

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endocrine disruptor

A substance which interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for development, behaviour, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis (normal cell metabolism).

Examples
DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

endocrine disruptor

(dĭs-rŭp′tĕr)
A chemical that may imitate or block the function of natural hormones if it is absorbed by the body. Many pesticides and plasticizing compounds, e.g., phthalates, are thought to disrupt endocrine pathways, esp. if they are absorbed by pregnant women during embryonic and fetal development.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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References in periodicals archive ?
The new EDC, ATL02, brings 15MW of additional critical power capacity to market.
Continuous monitoring of airborne fungal contamination by using EDCs combined with multilocus variable number tandem-repeat analysis genotyping traced the source of A.
Ulbrich and her colleagues examined exactly such a time window in their study with pigs: to simulate the intake of EDCs via drinking water or food, they exposed pregnant sows to varying doses of estradiol-17[eth], a natural estrogen, via their daily feed either over the course of the whole gestation period or only during the first ten days after fertilisation.
Despite strong calls by each of these organizations to not overlook EDCs in the clinical arena, as well as emerging evidence that EDCs may be a risk factor for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), EDC exposure may not be on the practicing ob.gyn.'s radar.
Current toxicity testing involves using expensive cell based, silica based, or animal-based models (lab rats) in conducting experiments that inform us on the effect of EDCs. Given that utilisation of these current testing modalities are not feasible globally, it is important to develop alternative testing technology that can be implemented in low/limited resource settings, but also have and even exceed the accuracy of current testing technology.
Other crucial fertility concerns are the epigenetic inheritable impacts of EDCs on the reproductive health of the next generation, the role of age on fertility, chronic stress contribution and the impact of infections and chronic disease.
It was reported that the EDCs were negatively charged and had a hydrophobic characteristic, and thereby it stably existed in the aquatic environment in a way of the negatively charged colloidal particles [9,17].
Breast, prostate and testicular cancer as well as reduced sperm production are some of the potential effects on human health associated to exposure to EDCs, but ecological effects have also been identified, such as altered sexual differentiation, malformation, feminization, alteration of immune function and decreased fertility in birds, fish and mammals, as well as their influence on embryonic development [4].
EDCs have been implicated in causing birth defects, cancer and neurodevelopment disorders.
Many environmental chemicals of concern both globally and across Africa are categorized as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (IPCS 2002; Bergman et al.
The culprits - endocrinedisrupting chemicals (EDCs) - are found in plastics, pesticides, cosmetics, paints, toys and food.