ecotone

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ecotone

(ē′kə-tōn′, ĕk′ə-)
n.
A transitional zone between two communities containing the characteristic species of each.

ecotone

the zone of distribution of an organism across the boundaries of which the individuals of a species become progressively fewer, less productive, and sometimes smaller.
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evolving ecosystem of interdigitating ecotones. The organic holism of
Uncoupled changes in tree cover and field layer vegetation at low Pyrenean treeline ecotones over 11 years.
Expectations for this model include genetic drift creating a pattern of random genetic divergence caused by a reduction in gene flow among subspecies across ecotones and a close genetic association among populations within subspecies and greater divergence among populations that are different subspecies.
Drought-induced shift of a forest-woodland ecotone: rapid landscape response to climate variation.
A new look at ecotones, issue 17, Biology International.
Once in the estuary, bay, lagoon or bayou, there are more subtle but equally important edge effects around ecotones. There are major foraging sites for spotted seatrout, snook, red drum and tarpon along the back side of a shallow bar on a flood tide, the edge of a seagrass meadow, or along the mangrove or grass margin in a productive wetland.
ricinus varied not only between host species, but also between sampling sites and was highest in ecotones (Kintai and Kaunas Botanical Garden Park) where adult ticks and other I.
In the area of transitional forests (ecotones) the temperature is similar to the rainforest unit.
Within a few hundred yards it's possible to see hardy alpine mosses, lichens and heathers, nitrogen-fixing shrubland and heather, and grasslands, with sharp ecotones between each.
Ecotones, we know, are perilous places, where predators
These management regimes will require dependable information on habitat associations, especially within uncommon, dynamic habitats such as ecotones. Lack of such information has long been identified as an area of deficiency (De Vos 1975; Gibbons 1988; Edwards et al.