immigration

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immigration

the movement of organisms into a specific area. Compare EMIGRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Be it partition, when the most of the educated and qualified Muslims crossed the border, and then economic migration to Gulf and now to the US and Canada, Muslims back home have been left without leaders and torchbearers.
While economic migration and forced displacement are distinct issues and require a different response, each has emerged as a complex development challenge.
However, while economic migration still accounts for the majority of movement across the globe, a swathe of non-economic pressures have pushed migration to the centre of media coverage and current political debate.
It had previously been noted that the French President has drawn the line between asylum seekers and "economic migrants" who "come from safe countries and follow economic migration routes, feeding ferrymen, organised crime and sometimes terrorism."
Our treatment of economic migration will be inside a paradigm that situates this phenomenon in the larger context of political economy such as to crystallize into a refutation of populist, hence unscientific argument against migration and hatred against (economic migrants).
By combining an analysis of China's political economy with current scholarship on the role of migration in economic development, China's Great Migration shows how the largest economic migration in the history of the world has led to a bottom-up transformation of China.
In Pakistan some positive aspects of economic migration in terms of remittances were reported among left behind families, including improvement in their economic condition, social changes, family relationships, educational achievements, savings and investment patterns.
"While we hope that international conflict resolution efforts will soon reduce the current refugee crisis, economic migration is, and will remain, a constant issue for the EU.
But economic migration is a different matter altogether.
The history of the community stretches back almost 70 years when labour shortages within key public services and industries prompted economic migration that is often but not only linked with the SS Empire Windrush in 1948.
The articles in the book fit into one of two major categories: religious migration or economic migration. The articles on religious migration provide a degree of focus and clarity to well-known issues in German history.

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