recession

(redirected from Economic depression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

recession

 [re-sesh´un]
the drawing away of a tissue or part from its normal position.
gingival recession the drawing back of the gingivae from the necks of the teeth, with exposure of root surfaces.

re·ces·sion

(rē-sesh'ŭn),
A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction.
[L. recessio (see recessus)]

re·ces·sion

(rĕ-sesh'ŭn)
1. A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction
2. Surgical operation in which an extaocular muscle is detached from the globe and reattached posteriorly.
3. Loss of gingiva on a tooth apically; measurement is made using a probe; findings are recorded as attachment loss.

recession

Surgical retroplacement of a part, especially the insertion of a muscle so as to weaken its action.

recession 

A surgical procedure used in strabismus in which an extraocular muscle is removed from its insertion and repositioned elsewhere on the globe, posteriorly to weaken it and anteriorly to strengthen it (called advancement procedure). See resection; strabismus surgery.

gin·gi·val re·ces·sion

(jinji-văl rĕ-seshŭn)
Apical migration of the gingiva along the tooth surface, with exposure of the tooth surface.
Synonym(s): gingival atrophy, gingival resorption.

recession (rēsesh´ən),

n a moving back or withdrawal.
recession, bone,
n apical progression of the level of the alveolar crest associated with inflammatory and dystrophic periodontal disease; a bone resorption process that results in decreased osseous support for the tooth.
recession, gingival,
n atrophy of the gingival margin associated with inflammation, apical migration (proliferation) of the epithelial attachment, and resorption of the alveolar crest.
recession, periimplant,
n the loss of gingival tissues around a dental implant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Handy argued that the analysis of economic depression and religion needed to begin before 1929 and that many complexities strained clear assessments of cause and effect between them.
As a result of this, the tax reforms in the period of economic depression might not give an expected result.
The last time in the long economic record that inequalities were almost as high was in the lead up to the economic crash of 1929 and the economic depression of the 1930s," researchers said.
Replying to a question, she reminded that economic depression was a global issue and even major powers are victims to it.
Residents' Parking Zones in Clive Road will kill off local businesses already suffering from the economic depression and Leckwith Road shopping development.
They surface from the collective hidden memory of this generation's men and women who went from suffering the greatest economic depression to the battlefields of the greatest war.
London, Jan 24 (ANI): Britain is heading for economic depression for the first time since the 1930s, economists have warned.
After gaining independence, all the states spiraled into economic depression and conflicts began or intensified that threatened their existence, though in recent years the states have appeared more stable.
A prolonged period of recession moves the economy into an economic depression.
Synopsis: Since March, the percentage of Americans largely ruling out the possibility of an economic depression in the next two years has shrunk from 40% to 25%, while the percentage saying it is "very likely" has grown from 23% to 35%.
ETUC General Secretary John Monks said that "The economy is already in the grip of recession and we are facing the prospect of a prolonged economic depression.
With international oil prices reaching astronomical new heights, and a government that has failed to respond with any coherent policies to mollify the impact on the country, Nicaragua could be heading for its worst economic depression in 70 years, according to Francisco Aguirre, president of the National Assembly's Economic, Production and Budget Committee, reports The Nica Times (May 30, 2008):

Full browser ?