economic credentialing


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economic credentialing

(e″kŏ-nom′ik, ē″)
The use of data about a health care provider's asset generation or resource utilization to determine whether that provider should be given clinical privileges in a hospital or health maintenance organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, Ramsey wanted documents from The Health Law Firm involving the economic credentialing issue connected with Baptist.
to the ulterior motivations of economic credentialing, (13) and how it
The hospital can reinternalize costs through at least three different mechanisms: economic credentialing, exclusive or bundled-discount managed care contracting, and vertical integration of hospitals and physicians.
It is clear that HMOs" pay-for-performance plans are a pretense for economic credentialing.
Clearly, HMOs' pay-for-performance plans are a pretense for economic credentialing.
Debates about the merits of economic credentialing are often confused by a lack of clear-cut definitions.
The use of this information for economic credentialing or public release of physician-specific data are just two of the concerns.
But, as has been said, "While economic credentialing once was limited to reviewing doctors' utilization profiles--arguably a quality issue--it has grown bolder.
4) Sometimes the argument is that privilege restrictions injure competition in the market for physicians' services: for example, such policies restrict physicians' ability to compete because access to multiple hospitals--including access to the specific hospital with the economic credentialing policy--is essential for physicians to be effective competitors.
This Note attempts to accomplish the following: (1) discuss what medical staff credentialing entails, (2) discuss what constitutes economic credentialing, (3) analyze the current law regarding medical staff credentialing, (4) analyze the current law regarding economic credentialing, and (5) propose a solution to the current system regarding the vague "relationship" that exists between a physician and a hospital.
Medical staff disputes, economic credentialing conflicts, insurer relations issues, and denial of coverage disputes are also being successfully mediated.
As late as 1993,40 of the 48 academic medical centers indicated their boards of trustees were very remote from issues of physician profiling and economic credentialing.

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