electrocochleography

(redirected from EcochG)

electrocochleography

 [e-lek″tro-kok″le-og´rah-fe]
measurement of electric potentials of the eighth cranial nerve in response to acoustic stimuli applied by an electrode to the external acoustic canal, promontory, or tympanic membrane.

e·lec·tro·co·chle·og·ra·phy

(ē-lek'trō-kok'lē-og'ră-fē),
A measurement of the electrical potentials generated in the inner ear and auditory nerve as a result of sound stimulation.
[electro- + L. cochlea, snail shell, + G. graphō, to write]

electrocochleography

Audiology A test for measuring sound-evoked cochlear potentials, which is part of the battery of auditory evoked potential tests, used to diagnose inner ear disease and for intraoperative monitoring of neurosurgery

e·lec·tro·co·chle·og·ra·phy

(ĕ-lek'trō-kok-lē-og'ră-fē)
A measurement of the electrical potentials generated in the inner ear as a result of auditory stimulation.
[electro- + L. cochlea, snail shell, + G. graphō, to write]
References in periodicals archive ?
A promising new area of exploration in the field of cochlear implants is the use of real-time electrocochleography (ECochG) recording during electrode insertion to monitor potentials in the cochlea.
ECochG, CNAP and ABR monitoring during vestibular Schwannoma surgery.
Thus, future studies should also explore the utility of this technique to record various responses like ECochg, PAM, VEMP, etc., which would greatly impact the time and efficiency of the test battery.
Electrocochleography (ECochG), a measure of electrical activity from the cochlea and the auditory nerve, is considered to be the only objective electrophysiological tool able to measure EH [7-9].
ECochG analysis for the identification of EH has long been based only on the ratio between SP and AP amplitudes.
The main objective of this study was to determine if unexplained ear fullness might be a symptom of EH by using ECochG SP/AP area and amplitude ratios.
Every participant underwent otoscopic examination under a microscopic vision, a hearing test (Itera II, Otometrics, USA), tympanometry, acoustic reflexes evaluation (Otoflex, Otometrics, USA), and ECochG recording (Smart EP, IHS, USA) using tympanic electrodes (Lilly TM Wick, Intelligent Hearing System, USA).
However, we performed our area measurements using a special software routine from Nicolet (IHS, USA) designed to measure the area under a curve defined by a straight line connecting two cursors placed at selected points on the ECochG waveform.
We suggest that these patients should be evaluated with ECochG using SP/AP area ratio analysis to determine if EH is present even in the absence of vestibular symptoms.
It is known that using intratympanic electrodes to record ECochG provides a larger SP and AP amplitude.
The presence of sensorineural hearing loss in the subject population but not in the control population could lead to test results that bias in favor of abnormal ECochG findings in the patient population.