echovirus

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Related to Echovirus infections: Echovirus 11, Echovirus 9

echovirus

 [ek´o-vi″rus]
a species of viruses of the genus enterovirus; the name was derived from the first letters of the description “enteric cytopathogenic human orphan.” At the time of the isolation of the viruses the diseases they caused were not known, hence the term “orphan,” but it is now known that they cause many different types of human disease, especially viral meningitis, diarrhea, and various respiratory diseases.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ECHO vi·rus

an enterovirus from a large group of unrelated viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, isolated from humans; although many inapparent infections occur, certain serotypes are associated with fever and aseptic meningitis, and some appear to cause mild respiratory disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

echovirus

(ĕk′ō-vī′rəs)
n. pl. echovi·ruses
Any of various enteroviruses of the gastrointestinal tract associated with certain diseases, such as viral meningitis, mild respiratory infections, and severe diarrhea in newborns.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ECHO vi·rus

, echovirus (ek'ō vī'rŭs, ek'ō-vī-rŭs)
An enterovirus isolated from humans; although there are many inapparent infections, certain of the several serotypes are associated with fever and aseptic meningitis, and some appear to cause mild respiratory disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ECHO vi·rus

, echovirus (ek'ō vī'rŭs, ek'ō-vī-rŭs)
Enterovirus isolated from humans; although there are many inapparent infections, some serotypes are associated with fever, aseptic meningitis, and other mild respiratory disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012