echolocation

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Related to Echolocating: Biosonar, Animal echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
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Single source sound production and dynamic beam formation in echolocating harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).
bats) are echolocating insectivores; the majority of the rest are frugivores.
Nevertheless, the results convincingly demonstrate sufficiency--some sighted participants can achieve echolocating precision approaching that of an experienced echolocator who is blind.
From the low rumble of a whale communicating with another blue half way across the globe, to the high frequency squeaks and clicks of echolocating spinner dolphins.Eoe1/4A[yen]
We first simulated the approach of an echolocating bat flying at a speed of 6.3 m [s.sup.-1] , assuming a call amplitude of 125 dB SPL at a distance of 10 cm (Jensen & Miller 1999, Holderied & von Helversen 2003), and a spreading loss of 6 dB per doubled distance and atmospheric attenuation of 1 dB m-1 (Sivian 1947, Lawrence & Simmons 1982).
Poetry paints nothing but it splashes color flushed, swooning, echolocating and often associated with flight .
Attack and defense: interactions between echolocating bats and their insect prey.
The scientists have received funding from the Office of Naval Research to do brain imaging work on echolocating dolphins to discover what parts of the brain are actively engaged in processing the echoes.
Target Detection in Noise by Echolocating Dolphins in Sensory Abilities of Cetaceans, Laboratory and Field Evidence.
Echolocating, they send bursts of clicks outward; lower frequencies to rough objects out, higher frequencies to fill in the details.
It is amazingly sophisticated and precise: An echolocating bat can detect objects as small as a human hair; it can use riverbanks, vegetation and other terrain features as acoustic landmarks; and it can determine not only a target's speed and direction, but also its size and surface texture.