Ebola

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Ebola

(ĭ-bō′lə, ĕb′ō-lä)
n.
1. A filovirus that causes disease in humans and nonhuman primates and spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people and animals. Bats are thought to be the host reservoir for the virus. Also called Ebola virus.
2. An acute, usually fatal form of hemorrhagic fever that is caused by this virus and is characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding, especially from the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. Also called Ebola disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola virus disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Ebola,

river in Zaire, Africa.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - Synonym(s): Ebola virus
Ebola virus - filovirus discovered in 1976, level 4 pathogen; severity of illness can run from mild to fatal in host. Synonym(s): Ebola hemorrhagic fever
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Targeting at this headache bothering the WHO and people in South Africa, Creative Biolabs provides various types of recombinant Ebolavirus antibody products to facilitate the Microbiology research, which can bring hopes to the drug and vaccine manufacturing.
Epitope data from the genus Ebolavirus extracted from the IEDB (as described above) were first oriented for position to reference GP sequences; data to date come from only EBOV, Sudan virus, and Bundibugyo virus GPs and include isoforms GP and ssGP.
The disease, once limited to rural areas has now affected the urban population as well.3 The present EVD epidemic is caused by the most lethal species of the virus known; the Zaire ebolavirus species with the case fatality rate is as high as 69%.
In humans, exposure to Ebolavirus leads to EVD, a severe, acute infection, with an incubation period (time from infection to onset of symptoms) ranging from 2 to 21 days.
[32] To date five distinct viral species have been ascribed to the Ebolavirus genus, namely Zaire, Sudan, Tai Forest, Reston and Bundibudyo Ebola viruses.
EVD is caused by a single stranded, negative sense, nonsegmented, enveloped RNA filovirus belonging to the genus Ebolavirus. This genus has 5 species (Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Zaire ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus, and Tai Forest ebolavirus Virus.
The pseudoviral particle generated in this study is a lentiviral vector carrying the GP of Zaire ebolavirus detected in the current outbreak (2).
(1,2) The known species include Bundibugyo Ebolavirus (BEBOV), Sudan Ebolavirus (SEBOV), Zaire Ebolavirus (ZEBOV), Reston Ebolavirus (REBOV) and Cote D'Ivoire Ebolavirus (CIEBOV), also known as, TaiForest Ebolavirus (TAFV).
Once the virus makes its way into the body's cells, it replicates itself and produces a protein called the ebolavirus glycoprotein that attaches to the cells on the inside of blood vessels causing them to become permeable and leak blood.
Genus Ebolavirus is 1 of 3 members of the Filoviridae family (filovirus), along with genus Marburgvirus and genus Cuevavirus.